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Thread: Course 53 33 EFTA RAF Caron July 1942

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    Default Course 53 33 EFTA RAF Caron July 1942

    Admins - if this is posted in wrong part of forum please move and advise accordingly.

    I have found a photo as per my thread title and would like more information about how and why this group was formed. Would be happy to post copy to anyone who genuinely has interest in this group - I believe a member of my family may be in the photo but sadly as any living relative has passed we cannot confirm.

    Thank you for any help that can be offered.

    HW

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    It is No.33 Elementary Flying Training School, Caron, Saskatchewan you are looking for.
    The usual source of information would be the unit's Operations Record Book.
    It is online and the July 1942 pages start here..... http://heritage.canadiana.ca/view/oo...40/621?r=0&s=4

    Unfortunately the record keeping relating to the dates of courses commencing and graduating, etc are very poor in this particular diary in 1942.
    There was an improvement in this aspect later but that is no help to you.
    Perhaps your only alternative will be a "class book" if such a thing exists for Course 53. I have seen one for Course 75.

    Sorry I cannot offer any more useful, Tony Broadhurst

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    Quote Originally Posted by Freshman View Post
    It is No.33 Elementary Flying Training School, Caron, Saskatchewan you are looking for.
    The usual source of information would be the unit's Operations Record Book.
    It is online and the July 1942 pages start here..... http://heritage.canadiana.ca/view/oo...40/621?r=0&s=4

    Unfortunately the record keeping relating to the dates of courses commencing and graduating, etc are very poor in this particular diary in 1942.
    There was an improvement in this aspect later but that is no help to you.
    Perhaps your only alternative will be a "class book" if such a thing exists for Course 53. I have seen one for Course 75.

    Sorry I cannot offer any more useful, Tony Broadhurst
    Thank you Tony - at least I know a little more and who knows a class book might turn up.

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    Hello Hollywood,
    The ORB given by Tony is also at Kew under the reference AIR 29/624/1. I have not seen it but since there are sometimes differences in the appendices of the ORBs held in the different archives it might be worth a look.

    HTH
    Bruce
    http://www.filephotoservice.co.uk/
    RESEARCH AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES & OTHER UK INSTITUTIONS

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    Default Course 53 33 EFTS, Caron July 1942.

    Yes, Bruce has a good point there.
    I have seen the ORB at Kew and made my original notes from it twenty-five, or more, years ago.
    I sure AIR 29/624/1 was a bound volume and I cannot recall what appendices were available. It is possible there are further pages and appendices available at Kew. At that time I was principally interested in the Cornell identities, rather than the courses.
    I purchased the microfilm reel C-12.340 whilst in Ottawa in 1999 and later added to my notes from the microfilm, including any available course details. What is available on the Heritage Canadian site are digital images from the same reel.

    If the subject of W.W.2 RAF training in Canada is new to you then there are several sources that will help. Aside from what you might find on the Internet, books such as "Aircrew Unlimited" (John Golley) and "By the Seat of your Pants" (Hugh Morgan) are useful sources. The books describe why and how untrained RAF aircrew students were dispatched to Canada, the USA, Rhodesia and South Africa for flying training - using examples of individual airmen's experiences.

    A typical journey might follow this pattern - Recruiting Centre; RAF Volunteer Reserve; Aircrew Reception Centre; Initial Training Wing; Grading School (from 1942); Air Crew Despatch Centre, Heaton Park, Manchester; Greenock to Halifax; No.31 Personnel Depot, Moncton; and possibly Toronto. From here prospective pilots would be posted to an Elementary Flying Training School and having passed that stage to a Service Flying training School where those who graduated received their pilot's Wings. There were also dedicated schools for Observer/Navigators, Wireless Operator/Air Gunners. As well as students already selected for posting to these establishments they would be joined by airmen who had been withdrawn from pilot training. Most RAF graduates returned to the UK via Moncton, Halifax and Greenock. Some, however were retained longer in Canada and posted to Operations Training Units and these may form a crew selected to ferry such as Lockheed Hudsons from Montreal to Prestwick.

    Schools such as No.33 EFTS., numbered in the 30 series were RAF manned and commanded, sometimes referred to as the "RAF transferred schools". The other schools being RCAF. The aircraft used were all on charge to the RCAF. The EFTS were initially all civil operated under contract to either the RAF or RCAF, with civilian Instructor and maintenance personnel. It was not unusual for courses at either RCAF or RAF Schools to include a mix of British, Canadian airmen and some from among the Occupied European countries. Some Service Flying Training Schools included courses of R Australian AF students who had under their elementary stage in their home country. Several schools were extensively used to train pilots and aircrew for the Fleet Air Arm. Both RAF and RCAF flying training schools taught the same syllabus and there were scheduled dates for intake and passing out.

    There were too many variations to cover in just two paragraphs but I hope the above conveys the general idea.
    Tony Broadhurst

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