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Thread: RAF Burials Margraten US Military Cemetery

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    Default RAF Burials Margraten US Military Cemetery

    Hi,

    I am wondering if anyone was information concerning the original locations where US forces recovered some RAF/Commonwealth airmen, prior to reinterring them in Margraten.

    Sgt J.G. Lynch RAF (650438) from 462 Squadron Halifax MZ488, crashed at an unknown location on night of 24-25 February 1945. Luftwaffe Interrogators at Dulag-Luft told surviving crew members that Sgt Lynch, F/L Ridgewell, and Sgt Rolls all died in the crash. American forces probably recovered all three from an unknown location in Germany and reinterring at Margraten. The RAF MRES could only identify Sgt Lynch in Plot F, Row 2, Grave 40 at Margraten.

    Sgt G.A. Sanday RAF (1896933) from 462 Squadron Halifax MZ461, crashed near Anrather Strasse on the southern outskirts of Krefeld on night of 24-25 February 1945. The Luftwaffe identified six of the crew and buried some or most of them in the Krefeld Bockum Neuer Friedhof. American forces discovered "three" unidentified bodies in the wreckage after capturing the area. I am presuming one of these was Sgt Sanday, who the Americans reinterred in Plot F, Row 2, Grave 40 at Margraten. Three of the eight-person crew are commemorated at Runnymede - I presume that their bodies were recovered from either the Krefeld Bockum Neuer Friedhof or Margraten but not identified as such and remain buried as unknowns.

    Does anyone have an information to confirm where the US forces discovered the bodies of Sgts Lynch and Sanday before moving them to Margraten?

    Regards

    Rod

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    Hello Rod,

    Re MZ488,
    This Halifax III served with a French Squadron as "H7-O".

    I believe the a/c you seek was MZ448 - "Z5- " of 462 Sqn.


    Interestingly Chorley in BCL vol 6, page 96 states -

    Lynch was in the crew of MZ448 and is noted as being buried in Holland at Venray War Cemetery.

    https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/c...,-john-george/

    Also

    a/c MZ461coded "Z5-G" unusually had a crew of seven.
    Three crew are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial and four are buried in the Reichswald Forest War Cemetery. Sgt. Sanday, George Arthur Edgar - 1896933 is not named as one of them. But is also at rest at Venray War Cemetery, Holland.
    So perhaps he was the eighth crewmen with this crew ?

    https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/c...-arthur-edgar/

    Alex
    Last edited by Alex Smart; 17th October 2018 at 12:13.

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    Hi Alex,

    thanks for the reply, and yes, MZ448 is the correct serial (oops).

    The Halifaxes carried a crew of eight.

    The two men now at Venray were recovered by American forces and initially buried at Margraten. Since those British and Commonwealth personnel at Margraten (a US cemetery) were eventually reinterred at Venray, the Graves Registration Forms show Margraten as the original place of burial rather than the locations where the Americans found the bodies.

    I've now done a comprehensive check of unknowns buried at Venray, and none of them obviously fit the bill of airmen reinterred from Margraten that could be from MZ447 or MZ461 (two unknown Sergeants have no known dates of death). I'm not aware of Margraten casualties being reinterred anywhere other than Venray...

    Cheers

    Rod

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    Hello RodM,
    MZ447 ? :)

    I have the same problem :)
    Type one thing only to see on screen something entirely different :)

    For the two airmen you named, CWGC gives the date of 25/02/1945 as date of death. Are you suggesting that it is only a presumed date ?

    Alex
    Last edited by Alex Smart; 17th October 2018 at 23:04.

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    Hi Alex,

    the two airmen likely died on the evening of 24 February 1945 (barring one or other dying of wounds). As was sometimes the case, the British authorities registered the date of death as the day following the nighttime operation. I have seen examples of crews who died in the same aircraft having official dates of death one day apart - which is simply an administrative anomaly.


    Cheers

    Rod

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