Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Sgt Hugh Crawford Carswell 202 Squadron Aldergrove Northern Ireland

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Sgt Hugh Crawford Carswell 202 Squadron Aldergrove Northern Ireland

    I am trying to research my father who was a Sargent Pilot and served in South Africa during the war and also at 202 squadron in Aldergrove in Norhern Ireland.
    He flew Halifax(s) out of Aldergrove and was involved in Met flights from about 1945 to at least 1949 when he was demobbed. His log book shows him as P2 with P1 being FO Brett.

    I am interested in finding information on a lost aircraft (Halifax) which was lost in poor weather in 1946 which involved an extensive air search for crew, aircraft were called into the search from Aldergrove, Ballykelly and Derry as well as the UK. No crew were found and there is no record of the aircraft.


    Any help would be appreciated


    Des Carswell

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northumberland, UK
    Posts
    3,553
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 58 Times in 55 Posts

    Default

    Hello Des

    Welcome to the Forum.

    Do you have a more specific date for the missing aicraft in 1946?

    There are a few newspaper reports from December 27th 1946 about a distress call being picked up from a French aircraft which reported that it had come down off Land's End, 16 miles south of Start Point, but was still afloat. A search was made by aircraft, a Navy frigate and two lifeboats, but nothing was found. A report from December 28th 1946 states that the message may have been a hoax, as the French authorities had no military or civil aircraft missing.

    Regards

    Simon

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Rhu, Argyll and Bute
    Posts
    355
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    Hi Des,
    Are you sure the loss was in 1946, as the nearest I can find is that 202Sqn lost ST807 on the 18th April 1947 West of the Shetlands with 9 crew missing. There was an extensive air and sea search carried out.

    Alan.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    4,407
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 22 Times in 22 Posts

    Default

    You can reveiw the 202 Sqn ORB on the national archives website

    Follow directions in this PDF.
    http://www.ww2irishaviation.com/TNA_...guidelines.pdf

    I presume there is a date for this search in his log book?
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    [COLOR=#333333]Thanks for the welcome and for your replies.

    Hugh was scheduled to complete Met flight and traveled with a fellow crew member to Aldergrove early on the morning of the flight. During the journey and in very poor conditions with fog and ice Hugh and his colleague were involved in a crash and were hospitalized.

    Needless to say Hugh and his colleague missed the flight.

    In stories that Hugh told in later life he always said that he was living on borrowed time. Hugh died in 1985.


    I have names of aircrew that were on [/COLOR]202Sqn lost ST807 on the 18th April 1947 now and I will cross reference some of these with P1's in earlier flights.

    Is there an archive of 202 squadron?


    Des Carswell

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    3,502
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 10 Times in 10 Posts

    Default

    Des, Hi,
    1592565 Flt Sgt A A Thompson, Met Air Observer, was also lost on this flight - thus the interest of the Met Office RoH co-ordinators.
    There is a 202 Sqn Association (http://www.202-sqn-assoc.co.uk/noticboard.html). They may be able to answer your questions.
    If you get really stuck then I have a personal contact to one of the past Editors of "The Mucky Duck" (202 Sqn Newsletter). But you will have to be really stuck if I call him!!!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    2,493
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    Des,

    I've an interest in 202 Squadron, and particularly the meteorologists who formed part of the crews were lost on these sorties. However, I don't have a record of anyone being lost in 1946. The nearest I can come is Alan's suggestion of April 1947.

    At about 0730 GMT on 18 April 1947, Halifax ST807 took off from Aldergrove for a BISMUTH sortie that should have taken it west, then northwest, of Northern Ireland. On board were nine crew members, including Albert Thompson (the meteorologist) and Squadron Leader Bisgood, the squadron’s training captain who was conducting a routine route check of the pilot.

    A message received at 0818Z advised the aircraft was at 55°13’N 12°00’W, and was returning to Aldergrove as the LORAN was unserviceable. At 0948 GMT ST807 was declared overdue and an ASR search was initiated. Despite an intensive search over the next three days no wreckage was sighted, and the operation eventually abandoned on the 21st.

    Weather conditions were poor throughout.


    Brian

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lyffe View Post
    Des,

    I've an interest in 202 Squadron, and particularly the meteorologists who formed part of the crews were lost on these sorties. However, I don't have a record of anyone being lost in 1946. The nearest I can come is Alan's suggestion of April 1947.

    At about 0730 GMT on 18 April 1947, Halifax ST807 took off from Aldergrove for a BISMUTH sortie that should have taken it west, then northwest, of Northern Ireland. On board were nine crew members, including Albert Thompson (the meteorologist) and Squadron Leader Bisgood, the squadron’s training captain who was conducting a routine route check of the pilot.

    A message received at 0818Z advised the aircraft was at 55°13’N 12°00’W, and was returning to Aldergrove as the LORAN was unserviceable. At 0948 GMT ST807 was declared overdue and an ASR search was initiated. Despite an intensive search over the next three days no wreckage was sighted, and the operation eventually abandoned on the 21st.

    Weather conditions were poor throughout.


    Brian

    Hi Brian

    Were there many MET Flight losses for 202 Sqn between 1946 and 1948 would you know. I am trying to narrow down the possibilities for the flight that hHugh may have missed


    Des

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    2,493
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    I believe there were, but my particular interest is in Met Air Observers (MAOs) who had previously been in the Met Office. Bit of history - MAOs, as a distinct aircrew category, began flying during with met reconnaissance squadrons during 1943. The squadrons were disbanded during 1945-6, but because of a continuing need for met data to the immediate west of the UK, 202 Squadron was reformed in 1946 taking on the role previously performed by 518 Squadron. MAOs were meteorologists, flying as aircrew during the war, but were demobilised between 1946 and 1947. At this time the RAF decided to retire the MAO trade and use redundant aircrew (navigators, air gunners etc) instead. As these were not Met Office staff my interest ceased.

    In 1949 the RAF revised its thinking and MAOs from the Met Office again became part of the crews.

    Thus there is a gap in my knowledge, between mid-1947 and mid-1949. I believe there were two, possibly three, fatal accidents during this period. You can search the ORBs yourself for this period to identify the accidents. The ORBs can be found online at http://discovery.nationalarchives.go...e/r/h/D8421655. It's a case of working through them to identify the occasions an aircraft failed to return. You need to concentrate on the Record of Events files.

    I suggest you start with 1 May 1947, the first date I can find with your father's name after the April accident.

    Brian

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •