Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Bomber crew posting in the North Africa, spring-summer 1943

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,412
    Thanks
    17
    Thanked 13 Times in 12 Posts

    Default Bomber crew posting in the North Africa, spring-summer 1943

    Hi all,

    I am studying a case of a Wellington bomber crew attached to 1443 Flight which flew a Wellington to north Africa in the middle of April 1943. Then they were with 22 PTC for nearly two months, being taken on strenght of 205 Gp only in June. Before the end of June crew was posted to 40 PTC and wait there for another three weeks before being posted to an operational squadron.

    So from my point of view it looks like a wasted three months when the crew can be already in operations. Were there any possible reasons for such a long period between the arrival and posting to the squadron? I suppose that this period pf war was quite a demanding on fresh crews as 205 Group was in operations against Sicily and Italy - supporting the invasion and preparing for the September one...

    Anyone has any idea or can confirm that this a was a standard process at the time?

    TIA

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,007
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts

    Default

    Anything was possible with the Desert Air Force! There was quite a lot of discussion on the question of apparently excessive numbers of aircrew personnel being posted to the Middle East and choking up the PTCs in 1943/44, perhaps even in 1942. There always seemed to be more aircrew than aircraft, and it was probably easier to hold back the surplus in the PTCs near the big cities with their distractions rather than having them stranded out in the desert near an aerodrome (usually an ALG), living in tents and foxholes, with nothing else to do. I am thinking I read this in the RAF Narratives on the campaigns in the Western Desert, where write offs and/or serious damage, as well as the short lives of aero engines in the difficult operating environment meant that serviceable aircraft might constitute only a minority of the total air strength actually on charge in the theatre. I'll bet that some of our Board members can come up with some diary entries of dissatisfied aircrew bemoaning their miserable and boring lives spent in the PTCs around Cairo, or wherever else they happened to be. It seemed that this was just a normal part of life in Egypt, and everybody knew it. Also at any given time, but particularly in the earlier days, large numbers of aircraft new to the theatre frequently spent a lot of time at MUs or other depots having desert modifications and other changes of equipment to suit them to the theatre, which of course reduced the numbers serving with the front line squadrons.
    David D

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,412
    Thanks
    17
    Thanked 13 Times in 12 Posts

    Default

    Hi David, thank you for your comment. Well your desfcription seems to me a little bit strange but on the other hand very reasonable from the other hand. I have not think about the thing from the housing point of view etc.

    I will be glad for other comments and possibly reminiscences from other members.

    TIA

    Pavel
    Last edited by CZ_RAF; 25th November 2018 at 09:43.
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •