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Thread: Different RAF form titles

  1. #1
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    Default Different RAF form titles

    Hi all, I am looking for right titles of following RAF Forms (they were maybe already mentioned in some older threads by Ross but I am unable to find them):

    RAF Form 530
    RAF Form 600
    RAF Form 700 - Aircraft Log Book? - http://www.rafcommands.com/forum/sho...raft-log-books
    RAF Form 800
    RAF Form 1125 - Inspection, Test, and Modification Certificate ?
    RAF Form 1213
    RAF Form 1860

    Any help much appreciated

    TIA

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Pavel, Hi,
    I may be able to get you something on the RAF F 600. It was mainly for Stores/Equipment demands, returns, and/or write-offs. I have some retired colleagues (on another Forum) who were experts in this sort of thing! I'll see what they may know!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    It would be very kind of your Peter.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Pavel,
    RAF Form 700 may still be in use to this day, although it may have a new (and longer!) number by now. It was NOT an aircraft logbook, it was the aircraft servicing form, and detailed all servicing (anything affecting an aircraft's serviceability and state of equipment, including fuel, oil, armament fittings and ordnance), or at least that is my understanding of it. The different tradesmen carrying out the work had to sign every entry of changes to its state of serviceability, including replenishments of fuel and oil, hydraulic fluid, etc, and when the captain of aircraft accepted the aircraft from the technical personnel he was supposed to flick over the details to see that all was as it should be, and then sign the form in appropriate column, and hand the form back to the technical NCO I/c of the aircraft. I think that Form 700 was in the form of a robust stiff card rather than paper, as it had to exist in a tough working environment, although it was supposed to be cared for so that it was always legible. The aircraft log book was a totally different form was totally different, and was mainly concerned with flying hours, inspections and repairs, and modifications incorporated, changes of engines and other components, and was almost certainly in the charge of the Engineer Officer of the unit, or one of his subordinates, and would not normally be carried in the aircraft, but would reside in the HQ of the technical part of the operating unit. I may not all the details precisely correct here, but there would be an AP on the responsibilities of those persons charged with maintaining these important technical publications.
    David D

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    F700 still in use a couple of years ago although the way that recording of work was carried out had changed.
    The last time I saw a 'real' F700 was when I was working on Hawk T60's in Zimbabwe 1983-84,it was still more or less in the old RAF format and we signed up for work carried out actually in the F700 pages.
    Since the early 1970's the RAF has used separate work cards for signing for work carried out (this can be a lot of writing for complex/long jobs) but the job cards are still cleared in the F700 by the supervising SNCO as there is a section in the 700 for placing the a/c unserviceable and each job card is given an individual serial number.
    The old F700 is mostly as David describes it above in post #4,The main F700 almost always stayed at Base,if any A/C were away from home base on a non operational flight they would take a 'Travelling' smaller F700,any relevant details would be transferred to the main F700 when the A/C returned to base.
    Certainly up until a few years ago a 'Traveller' would still be carried when away from base.
    More modern a/c may use a different system - I retired 3 years ago and was not involved with 'modern' a/c.

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    Hi David and bvs, thank you both for your comments.
    I am interested in the WWII period and my idea is to get the exact title or name of the particular paper/form/card - if it has any.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    I think David was correct with 'Aircraft Servicing Form' during WW2.

    But known to all Aircrew/Groundcrew as 'The 700'.

    If an aircraft was Serviceable - it was 'On the top line' which may be a reference to a page or form layout.

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    Thanks bvs, well I know that the service personnel is familiar with the "form 700" or the "700" but my book would be for "civils" and even more for Czech readers only:-)

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    The 1953 variant of the RNZAF's Form 700 was actually printed on paper but was enclosed in a brown cardboard protective cover (with its own Form number). Form 700 was definitely called "Aircraft Servicing Card" at this time, and there were in fact several variants in use simultaneously for most of the 1950s -70s period, possibly ten or more, to suit different types of aircraft, as well as for various miscellaneous purposes. If you are able to get access to RAF AP 113 (preferably wartime editions) they will explain all the variations in use at that time. AP 113 was the index for all RAF Publications (APs) as well as Forms, so this is exactly what you should be looking for, as this will hopefully provided all the answers you desire. Hopefully the RAF Museum will have some wartime editions of this very useful document available for inspection. The RNZAF Museum has quite a few postwar versions, of RNZAF as well as RAF AP 113.
    David D

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    I have a copy of a page from (I think) 1944, which is headed as follows:

    RAF Form 700
    (Single Engine)

    AIRCRAFT SERVICING FORM
    (Certificate and Record)
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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