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Thread: WW2 Convoy Passenger Manifests

  1. #11
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    Very many thanks, Simon; I don't recall ever seeing that entry, but the CWGC has him as a civilian war death. Davidson was one of the first meteorologists we (Peter and myself) researched for the Met Office Book of Remembrance and we had practically no experience in this field of research. We were particularly wary of believing the Met Office sent forecasters/observers to Canada since there appears to be nothing on file and the Canadians were more than competent in the field. So we now have another mystery - why were they sent (just me thinking aloud, not looking for an answer).

    Your posts have been extremely helpful, thanks again.

    Brian

  2. #12
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    No problem Brian, happy to have been of some help. Thanks for the e-mail too - a very interesting article. I wonder if Peebles High School may have any information about him in their archives?

    Regards

    Simon

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    Having done some rummaging around in AP 1134 (The Second World War 1939-1945: Meteorology) I think I've found the link in respect of Met Office personnel serving in Canada. It concerns the transfer of certain aviation schools to Canada during 1940 and 1941:

    1. The School of Air Navigation was transferred from St Athan to Port Albert, Ontario during November 1940
    2. No 2 School of General Reconnaissance was transferred from Squires Gate to Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island during December 1940
    3. '.... a Service Flying Training School' (sic) was transferred to Kingston, Ontario during March 1941
    4. '..... an Air Navigation School' (sic) was transferred to Hamilton, Ontario, during August 1941

    In each instance civilian Met Office staff accompanied the transferred schools, and the dates should provide a clue as to when they crossed the Atlantic. Thus Armour's final destination (see #2) was Hamilton with one of the Air Navigation Schools.

    Edit. Thank you for your off-board emails, Simon, and your suggestion above. I tried that in about 2006/7 but without success.

    Brian
    Last edited by Lyffe; 25th April 2019 at 08:24.

  4. #14
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    Can anyone identify the SFTS and ANS referred to at items 3 and 4 in my previous post please?

    Brian

  5. #15
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    If I read Sturtivant FT&SU correctly it was 31 FSTS and 33 ANS?
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  6. #16
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    Thanks Peter, 33 ANS was formed at Weeton in April 1941 before moving to Canada in June. I think 31 SFTS had previously been 7 Service Flying School at Peterborough.

    Brian

  7. #17
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    A query for our Canadian colleagues.

    Whilst researching the life of Downie Gillies Armour I've found that his Scottish parents emigrated to Canada during the spring of 1911, en route for Edmonton. By 1916 they were farming at Uinist Creek in Alberta (1916 Census via Ancestry) in the electoral district of Victoria. I'm unable to find any other reference to Uinist Creek, probably not helped by the fact that the Victoria electoral district was abolished in 1924.

    I would appreciate any advice as to the location of Uinist Creek

    As an aside, Downie (born November 1920) was the youngest of four sons. His mother, Mary, might have died in childbirth as his father, Charles, returned to Scotland with the three oldest boys in 1922. Downie followed in 1926, escorted by a lady who had no obvious connection with the family.

    Brian

  8. #18
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    Just to answer my own question, I'm advised by Edmonton Public Library that Uinist Creek was probably Cree Indian name for a landmark just to the southwest of Tofield, Alberta, (53.22 N, 112.40 W). Downie's mother was buried in Tofield Cemetery on 18 December 1920, less than a month after his birth (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/...09/mary-armour).

    Brian
    Last edited by Lyffe; 22nd May 2019 at 08:00.

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