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Thread: F/L Korer Ralph 119790

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    Default F/L Korer Ralph 119790

    Hello ,

    F/L Korer Ralph 119790 pilot RAF died on september 1944 , he's buried at the Rheinberg War Cemetery , was he killed during an ops ?

    Regards
    Alain12

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    Alain
    Ralph Korer
    b. Q1 1921 (MMS Isaacs) Reg Stockport 8a 118
    Aug 1940(?) Enlisted Padgate
    19 Dec 1941 1077616 Sgt Ralph Korer Cmd Plt Off RAFVR(GD) (119790)
    19 Dec 1943 Prom Flt Lt
    24 Sep 1944 KOAS Transit Pershore>Cagliari Dakota KG653 (RAFWEB)
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Be interesting to know the Branch/Trade of the other crew members (presume Korer was the Pilot?). The shooting-down seems to have taken place around midday(-ish) - but certainly in daylight. KG653 seems to have been caught immediately post-cold front. It would - one assumes - have been relatively easy to determine the sun's position? There is a magnetic compass in the middle of the instrument panel coaming immediately behind the centre windscreen divider (or, at least, there is one in my FSX C-47!).
    TIA
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Thank you for the info
    Alain12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Resmoroh View Post
    Be interesting to know the Branch/Trade of the other crew members (presume Korer was the Pilot?). The shooting-down seems to have taken place around midday(-ish) - but certainly in daylight. KG653 seems to have been caught immediately post-cold front. It would - one assumes - have been relatively easy to determine the sun's position? There is a magnetic compass in the middle of the instrument panel coaming immediately behind the centre windscreen divider (or, at least, there is one in my FSX C-47!).
    TIA
    Peter Davies
    Crew of KG653:

    119790 F/L (Pilot) Ralph KORER RAFVR
    165184 P/O (Navigator) Lionel Alfred VEARY RAFVR
    AUS116352 Sgt (W./Op.) George BECKOFF RAAF

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 1st May 2019 at 12:32.

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    Col,
    Tks for that – it was what I had assumed!
    Now, I am not a qualified pilot – but I was taught how to handle an aircraft in-flight by an ex-Hastings OCU Instructor. One of the things he said was “If you’re driving an aeroplane never mind what the compass and directional instruments are telling you, first just check that the sun is in the right place for the direction you are supposed to be going to! Then check the instruments for the detail!”.
    In the case of KG653 we have an a/c that is 250nm ‘off-track’ after only a couple of hours flying. After that time he should have been somewhere near the R Loire SE of Orleans – with the sun fairly well ‘on the nose’! But in stead he was heading E/SE into Germany – with the sun somewhere over the starboard wing. Don’t compute!
    If I had to bet some of your money, I would be looking for a possible lightning strike upsetting the directional instruments, and our Skipper/Nav/WOp – in the confusion (and being attacked by fighters!!) – forgot the ‘sun trick’?
    Not the first time this has happened! We had much discussion (on this forum) many years ago of an alleged similar case of ignoring (either through ignorance, or deliberately) the sun’s position!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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