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Thread: Air miles between turning points on operations.

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    Default Air miles between turning points on operations.

    I have been reviewing the entries in the diary of F/Lt J.A. Anderson DSO DFC of 419 Squadron for his operations and I am trying to reconcile the differences in distances that he records for his operations with my estimates for the sum total distances between all turning points. In all instances his estimates significantly exceed what I calculate using trigonometry for "Great Circle" distances between turning points. Has anyone encountered any calculated distances between turning points in any historical documents from Bomber Command?

    Jim

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    Jim,
    PM me the TPs. I'll do a series of calculations. I'll "fly" the route several times to see what - if any - variations there are, and let you and the Forum know!!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Hi Peter: I sent you a pm.

    Jim

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    Jim,
    Click on "Resmoroh" - my email address is in the drop-down box!
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Gents, I am confused by the term "Air Miles". The AP for Navigation talks about nautical miles and statute miles; no air miles. A "Google " site talks about air miles and nautical miles being the same. Jim, what do you mean by air miles? Regards, Terry

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    Sorry Terry. Poor choice of terms. These would be statute miles in this case. There is a bit of an issue with understanding whether the indicated “miles” in the historical documents on record are statute or nautical: Bomber Command was in transition from statute to nautical miles towards the end of the war, but the pace was slowed because of the availability of replacement ASI units calibrated to knots. 419 and 428 squadrons were still using statute miles for navigation at the end of operations in April 1945, but I believe the briefing documents were in Nautical miles.

    Jim

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    Jim, No problems. I have some flight plans drawn up by a nav on 226 Sqn flying Mitchells out of Swanton Morley in 43/44. It would seem he used the 1;250000 and 1:500000 Ord Survey (Air) series and his plotting was in statute miles. The question is did the route arrive at the station in nautical miles and he converted to conform with the chart? This is of course your dilemma and I suspect my answer doesn't solve it. In past posts people have come up with the route to be flown as passed by higher HQs. Perhaps if you posed the request for a specific mission someone may have the answer, but I suspect it may just refer to turning points. Regards, Terry

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    Jim (et al)
    I think the problem is, basically, that people writing plans, reports, sometimes forget to indicate the units being used – as Jim has found out! But add to that what has clearly happened here is that some Units in the same organisation were using different units of measurement. Then you have the problem of some not stating precisely which Time Zone is being used. Even in relatively modern times (mid-50’s) in the Mediterranean the RAF preferred to use GMT, but the Army preferred to use Local Time (we never did discover what Time Zone the Navy were using!). There was a whole department in NATO devoted to producing Operating Standards (STANAGs) – but in WW2 they had some difficulties!!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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