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Thread: Radio School Posting

  1. #1
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    Default Radio School Posting

    I am researching an Australian who qualified as a Wireless Operator / Air Gunner before arriving in the UK in December 1943. Having spent a few months at 11 PDRC he was posted to No 2 Radio School for a couple of months and I was wondering if this was (a) for additional training [if so, what], or (b) for ongoing holding, or (c) as an instructor.

    He was posted on to AFU after a couple of months and then followed the standard OTU / HCU route into an operational squadron

    Has anyone come across other Commonwealth airmen taking the same route through Radio School and can therefore advise on what he may have been doing there?

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  2. #2
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    PeteT,
    The only things I can think of are:
    1. Getting his tx/rx speeds up to the required level. This can only be done with (much!!) practice. He was aircrew, and would – therefore – be using a lot of air/ground circuits. The W/Ops on the Kipper Fleet could tx/rx at about 30 wpm (sometimes higher!). This was using standard ‘brass keys’ (‘bug’, or ‘side-swiper’ keys were not common in WW2). I was never formally trained as a W/Op. I learned my W/Opping “sitting by Nellie!”, and I was not very good (understatement!) at it! Often, when I had laboriously sent 3 lines of 5-grouped numeric message the d/t W/Op would come back with “QSD” – defective keying!!!
    2. The other thing he might have been learning was new cct disciplines and procedures. And which ccts were used where/when. And, by no means last, learning new crypto procedures. But I would have thought that this was unlikely to take two months?
    My Morse rx has got so poor that I struggle to ident the VOR/NDB signals on my flight sim!!
    Best I can do!
    Peter Davies
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 26th September 2019 at 15:17.
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  3. #3
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    Hi Pete, I have not come across such a case but I have a similar case of a pilot trained in the US and after some time in navigation course, then in depot in Canada and another depot after arrival to the UK he was posted to the EFTS for pilot refreshing course as he was not flying as a pilot for about half a year.
    I think it may be the same with you man who was qualified WOP/AG but after arrival to the UK spend few months without an activity so he was posted there for refreshment. But I cannot exclude that after some course he was not kept there as an instructor.

    HTH

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  4. #4
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    Hi Pete,

    Iíve got the details of a Aussie who enlisted in January 1943 trained as a W/Op arrived in the UK on the 28 March 1944 and was posted to the Radio School on 1 February 1945 and stayed there until the end of the war and returned to Australia in November 1945.

    Cheers,

    John.

  5. #5
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    Thanks as always to you all for your feedback.

    I have carried out some more research since my initial posting and noticed that his service record shows he was mustered as a Wireless Operator / AG after he had completed his training in Australia and then mustered as a Wireless Operator (Air) just before the posting to the Radio School.

    I am not sure if this suggests that he needed additional training in this new role (or whether in 1943 / 1944, WOP / AG [Australia] was equivalent to WOP (Air) [UK]).

    I am still struggling to find any course content, so it may well be that I will have to leave this section of my research with a note stating that at this stage, it is assumed that he was receiving more advanced training in airborne wireless techniques.

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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