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Thread: Double Sunrise Flights

  1. #1
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    Default Double Sunrise Flights

    Hello All,
    Looking for a biog/dates of a Sqn Ldr Hogan, RAAF, (possibly Met Branch, but maybe GD Pilot?) active late WW2 in the Perth, WA, area on the “Double Sunrise” Perth>Colombo>Perth Catalina flights.
    These took a very, very, long time at a TAS of 110kts!!!!
    TIA
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Hello,

    LIST OF OFFICERS OF D. MET. S. AS AT 1 January, 1945.

    62498 S/L John 'Doc' HOGAN RAAF - (t) (ASD) 17.4.41

    One of the most remarkable developments in the activities of the Perth Divisional Office occurred on 10 May 1943 as a result of the commencement of the non-stop flights across the Indian Ocean between India and Perth. The first of these flights was made by Wing Commander Scott of the Royal Air Force. In order to give special attention to this important new service, Flight Lieutenant J. (Doc) Hogan was transferred from Pearce air base to the Divisional Office. On 31 May 1943, Wing Commander Grimes, a RAF meteorological officer, arrived from India, and accompanied by Hogan, proceeded to Melbourne to attend a conference concerning the organisation of meteorological services for the new trans-Indian Ocean route. In July 1943, QANTAS commenced a regular trans-Indian Ocean service, and was serviced meteorologically by the regular interchange of weather forecasts, and analyses between Perth and Colombo. A special weather section was established at the Perth Divisional Office in August 1943 exclusively for this flight under the immediate control of Flight Lieutenant Hogan.

    This new trans-Indian Ocean service was required because Burma and the Netherlands East Indies were occupied by the Japanese, thus severing the route from Europe and India to Brisbane. The provision of the required weather services was one of the most important functions at any of the Divisional Offices in Australia during the war. The QANTAS Empire air route required both pre- and mid-flight forecasts over what was the longest hop in the world. The first aircraft flying into the Cocos Islands from Australia became lost and had to return. It was only because Hogan correctly forecast tail winds at 10,000 feet that the plane reached its base - with both fuel gauges showing empty. Forecasting over such long distances was difficult. Large aircraft - firstly Catalinas, then Liberators, then Lancasters [sic] - had to be used. They had to carry an overload of fuel and preserve radio silence amid the strong winds, storms - sometimes tropical cyclones - of the Indian Ocean. No less 821 crossings were made during the war, and not one aircraft was lost. It was in this manner that the expansion of meteorological services helped to make possible the future great international air routes of the world.

    Throughout the war, the Divisional Meteorologist at Perth was Wing-Commander A. G. Akeroyd*. Next in command was Squadron-Leader W. L. Nelson**, who was succeeded later by Squadron-Leader J. (Doc) Hogan.

    * Honorary Wing-Commander Arthur Gordon AKEROYD
    ** 292510 William Leslie NELSON (t) (ASD) 1.1.45

    See:
    The Story of the RAAF Meteorological Service (Metarch Papers No.5, October, 1993)
    John Joyce, Dr.
    N.P.,:Bureau of Meteorology,1993.
    pp.84-5.

    Following might also be of interest:

    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8170821

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 3rd October 2019 at 16:50.

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    Tks Col. Where do I go for any Reports/Debriefs for these flights? They must have had an XXL Elsan!!!
    Rgds
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Hello,

    Short of visit to the QANTAS Research Library (in Sydney), your best shot is to try and obtain a copy of the following book (expensive, and hard-to-find):

    QANTAS EMPIRE AIRWAYS (Western Operations Division) - INDIAN OCEAN SERVICE 1943 - 1946.
    Pattison, Barry & Geoff Goodall.
    Footscray (Victoria):Aviation Historical Society of Australia,1979
    S/C., 64 pages.

    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/253967810833

    http://www.goodall.com.au/published-...dian-ocean.htm

    Geoff Goodall still maintains an extensive website, give him a yell!

    http://goodall.com.au/contact.htm

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 3rd October 2019 at 16:57.

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    Col,
    Tks for all yr help/info/steers. I've emailed Geoff Goodhall. We've got a slightly better version of the jig-saw box lid picture! Not yet certain we've got all the bits of the jig-saw, or where they fit!!!
    Rgds
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Just a correction and amplification about "Wing Commander Scott of the Royal Air Force". This is C835 Wing Commander John Charles Scott, RCAF of No.413 Squadron, later DSO. The following excepts from the ORB of No.413 Squadron tell the story:

    3 May 1943: Aircraft FP244, W/C Scott and crew airborne at 0216 (Z) hours on freight transport trip to Australia. This was the first trip of a weekly service started between Ceylon and Australia. Special long range Catalinas with overload tanks, no armament, and skeleton crews have been provided for this undertaking by the B.O.A.C. This squadron will be doing this trip every two weeks, the crews and maintenance being provided by the station. Aircraft successfully made landfall at Exmouth Gulf at 0800 hours on the 4th, landed, refuelled, and took off at 0205 hours/4th, landing at Crawley Creek, Perth, at 0805 hours.

    12 May 1943: Aircraft FP244, captain W/C Scott and crew airborne Exmouth Gulf, Australia at 0300/11th on return trip to Ceylon. Waterborne Koggala 0845/12th. Number of hours on trip to Australia (Koggala to Exmouth Gulf) - 11.16 day, 12.15 night. Number of hours on return trip to Ceylon - 11.25 day, 14.00 hours night.

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    Hugh/Col,
    Hugh, mni tks that! Do you have any details of the Met staffs at either end?
    Col, Geoff Goodhall came back to me very quickly! He's got nothing more. There is a file on Thompson in the Oz Archives, but it only details his hospitalisation - no background!
    Tks both!
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Hugh/Peter,

    Apologies about C835 W/C John Charles SCOTT DSO RCAF. I was aware of his correct identity, but just transcribed his details directly from the journal article.

    Two references I have both quote the time of departure of the 413 Sqn Catalina from Koggala Lake (Ceylon), as 8.46 a.m., alighting on the Swan River (Crawley Bay), Perth, at 8.05 a.m, the next morning.

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 6th October 2019 at 02:38.

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    Canadian Wg Cdrs are, clearly, from a very specific mold!!
    Scott goes off on a trip that will require him to extract more mpg from his ‘gravy’ over a much longer period of time than most have done before.
    This has a personal aspect. When I first joined the UK Met Office at RAF Wittering we still had a Sqn of Lincolns. The Wg Cdr Flying was Wg Cdr A P Huchala, DFC, RCAF, (J/25362) (an indigenous Canadian!). A couple of Lincoln crews were at Met briefing on an early Saturday morning. They were due to do a routine, boring, “twice-round-the-UK NAVEX”. There was thick fog. The crews were “muttering”. They clearly had social engagements that evening, and were not keen to get diverted! Huchala said “Wait”. He disappeared. 10 mins later he was back. He said “I’ve just driven down the runway at take-off speed [he had a ‘pokey’ sports car!]. I could see 3 runway lights from my level. Off you go!”. And they did!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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