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Thread: German weather stations in Iceland ?

  1. #1
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    Default German weather stations in Iceland ?

    I have discovered an RCAF Press Release, circa March 1945, which describes the career of Flight Lieutenant John East Cuninghame (an odd spelling, I admit), who was apparently a “radio engineer”. For purposes of this inquiry, the meat and bones of the Press Release is as follows:

    Before coming to Britain the young Canadian was a member of a radar party sent to Iceland to locate the German radio stations operating in the northern reaches of the island. These enemy posts operated in isolated and inaccessible locations gathering weather information which was probably relayed to German submarines in the North Atlantic.

    “Yes, we strung radar stations along the Arctic Circle in that cold job”, reported Flight Lieutenant Cuninghame. “We located the enemy posts all right and the army captured the equipment and radio personnel. One post we located on a glacier 45 miles long and 30 miles wide on the slopes of one of the largest ice-caps. The Germans had landed the men and equipment on the glacier with ski-equipped aircraft. The radio equipment was marvellous and the radio post well organized.”

    I can confirm the existence of such an RCAF officer (service number C3551) in the Signals trade. The story mentions prewar employment with radio station CHML, Hamilton, Ontario (which did exist - and still does). He was commissioned in the RCAF on 11 December 1940. Without access to his service file I have only limited access to other records and at this time I can confirm neither his years of birth or demise.

    The nub of my inquiry is not Flight Lieutenant Cuninghame but the German radio stations in Iceland, especially their reported deployment by ski-equipped aircraft. Google searches (admittedly a shallow research method) show nothing, although there is much about the German presence in Greenland, 1942-1944, none of which squares with the above Press Release. Has anyone else heard of these Iceland stations and their suppression ?
    Last edited by HughAHalliday; 2nd November 2019 at 11:15. Reason: punctuation

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    Hugh,
    I know that Brian (c/s Lyffe) has done some considerable work on this topic some years ago. But at the moment he is rather busy with other matters. He may come on the cct, but if he doesn't in the next day or so I'll contact him directly!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    PS I've just remembered. You might try the Icelandic Aviation Museum at Akureyri. But be warned, I've emailed them three times in the last 5 years (with the script in both English, and Google's Icelandic). No indication that the email had "bounced" - but no response. It's times like these that we miss the late, great, Ragnar J Ragnarsson!!!
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 2nd November 2019 at 13:29. Reason: Additions
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Hugh,

    Re: Cuninghame/Radar/Iceland. The following might be of interest:

    http://rquirk.com/cdnradar/cor/chapter3.pdf - CLINTON - MY HOME SWEET HOME.

    See: pp.9-11 of 16

    In my opinion, the Germans had no manned weather stations in Iceland during WWII. The stations/crews that were captured were probably in Greenland, or elsewhere.

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 2nd November 2019 at 15:14.

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