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Thread: Lts Ray Treborek and George Hess (B-17 crewmen) captured Java 1942

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    Default Lts Ray Treborek and George Hess (B-17 crewmen) captured Java 1942

    Hi guys

    One of our Forum members briefly mentioned Treborek's and Hess' capture (early March 1942?) after having been befriended by a Dutch family, who then handed them over to the Japanese. Apparently there was a court case of some description in the 1990s in the USA.

    Can anyone enlighten me, please?

    Cheers
    Brian

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    Apologies!

    The name should be TEBOREK !

    Cheers
    Brian

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    Brian,

    There is plenty in the media on Raymond G. Teborek, both during and post war.

    But nothing on any trial in the 90s. I found nothing in the archives of this forum on Teborek or Hess.

    Any other hints?

    Regards,

    Dave

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    Hi Dave

    This is the piece to which I refer - perhaps not on this forum, but another. I don't know the identities of the two posters, apart from the main contributor shown as Nelson. Was Teborek a POW?


    I don't sound naïve in posing this question, but what the heck was going on? Given all the ABDA-this and ABDA-that, I thought the Americans, British, Dutch, and Australians were allies. Although I realize that the notion to surrender originated with the Dutch—and one has to concede they had families living in the Netherlands East Indies for whom they feared—and was opposed initially by the Anglo-Americans, the notion of Dutch KNIL officers (implicitly white) going out of their way to capture their erstwhile allies and turn them in to the not-so-tender mercies of the Japanese seems to this lad like ingratitude and outright betrayal. Not to mention I've heard this sort of story too many times. I tried vainly to find and include as a linker a first-person account by a former RAF Lockheed Hudson pilot who was befriended by a Dutch family, including the invitation to accompany them on an idyllic picnic in the hills, but immediately unbefriended by them upon the landing of the Japanese. All of a sudden, or so it seems, at the surrender and even near-surrender, many (most?) of the Dutch turned on the Anglo-Americans. ferreted them out, and enabled their capture. And I'm talking the Dutch, not the members of the native population, who despised white men without distinction, aiding in their capture and sometimes even killing them. At least I hope I'm not being naïve in seeking non-politically correct responses.

    Nelson

    This sounds remarkably like the case concerning the pilots Ray Teborek and George Hess in Bandung. These guys were arrested during their escape from Bandung after having spent some time with a Dutch family. Some details can be found in a slander court case from the 90's.


    Cheers
    Brian

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    Brian,

    Yes, Teborek was a POW.

    That story comes from https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/theo...ava-t1615.html

    Pertains to this: https://translate.google.com/transla...45&prev=search

    For "early 1941" read 1942.

    Regards,

    Dave

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