Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: RAF West Malling October 4th 1940

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,664
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default RAF West Malling October 4th 1940

    Hi,

    Hoping someone may have a copy of the station records book. Looking for any details on the arrival of a Bristol Blenheim of No.218 Squadron skippered by S/Ldr Gillman 'B' Flight commander.

    TIA

    Steve
    No.218 (Gold Coast) Squadron Association Historian
    No.623 squadron Research

    ~~IN TIME ~~

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    3,724
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 21 Times in 21 Posts

    Default

    Steve,
    1300A 4 Oct 1940 Croydon reporting SW Force 2, Temp 37F (+03C), 4/8ths @ 3000ft (give or take a bit!!). W Malling 22 miles ESE of Croydon.
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Resmoroh For This Useful Post:

    Steve Smith (5th December 2019)

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    3,724
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 21 Times in 21 Posts

    Default

    Hello All,
    You can get a generalised impression(s) of the weather at any UK location during WW2 by going to https://digital.nmla.metoffice.gov.u...-a7d8c3eceb84/ and copying (for free!) the weather from the DWR of the date. There are a number of Stations. Their Obs are reported 4 times per day. The Obs are coded. The decode instructions are included for the DWRs. There are also charts.
    Every Met Office manned Airfield/Station maintained a “Daily Register of Observations”. This is a Formal TNA Registered Document (I think Form 2050 – but can’t be certain). This Daily Register will contain hourly observations of the Met conditions (when the Office was open). If there was an “Aircraft Incident” on/near the airfield then a “Crash Ob” would have been done (in red ink) in the Register.
    The vast majority of these Registers are kept in the Met Office Library Archives (excepting those ‘lost’ due to military retreats/defeats).
    How they are accessed, and at what cost(s), I do not know. But if the recorded weather is pertinent to your research(es) then it should be available. The Red Crash Obs in any Register would be the precise same information that will have been presented (either on paper, and/or viva voce) at any CoI.
    The Met Office Library/Archives at Exeter will be able to (a) advise on any recorded data available, and (b) advise on the costs of professional comment on that data!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,664
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi,

    I not really after the weather conditions, more the time of arrival, the cause of the diversion, damage etc.

    But thank you anyway.

    Steve
    No.218 (Gold Coast) Squadron Association Historian
    No.623 squadron Research

    ~~IN TIME ~~

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •