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Thread: "No Time for Fear"

  1. #1
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    Default "No Time for Fear"

    Does anyone have a copy of "No Time for Fear", and, if so, would you be able to advise me on what it says about W Barrington (35 Squadron) on Page 175?

    Your usual help would be much appreciated

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  2. #2
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    Hello Pete,

    Part 5 1944

    DEAD CLEVER.

    Junkers 88s from a nearby airfield habitually 'buzzed' Stalag 4B and, on 30 May 1944, the inevitable happened - one came in too low. The prisoners were taking an evening stroll just within the compound boundary when the plane took away part of the barbed wire and staggered into the sky again leaving two dead. Had the plane crashed, the death toll would have been crushing in such a small crowded place.

    From the end of August 1943 almost all captured NCO aircrew had been sent from Dulag Luft direct to Stalag 4B at Muehlberg. The Luft camps were full. Finally 4B held nearly 2,000 airmen. one of the strangest cases was that of Flight Sergeant Winston Barrington, whose mother lived in Germany with Barrington's stepfather, said to be an Oberst in the Photographic section of the Luftwaffe. With the cooperation of the camp authorities, Barrington's mother visited him frequently, and is believed to have joined her son in the camp prior to the cessation of the fighting and to have returned to Britain with released prisoners.

    See:
    No Time For Fear True Accounts of RAF Airmen Taken Prisoner, 1939-1945.
    Gammon,Victor F.
    London:Arms & Armour,1998.
    p.175

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 14th January 2020 at 02:34.

  3. #3
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    Did this event happen more than once. HB. Mallory RCAF was killed on April 30,1944 by a low flying JU-88, going thru the barbed wire fence.
    Richard

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    Hello,

    I'm no apologist for Gammon, so let's get the facts straight:

    Bad things come in threes. PoWs at Muehlberg were accustomed to seeing low-flying German aircraft from the Lonnewitz night-fighter training airfield. At around 2 p.m. on 30 April (1944), they watched as a Ju 88 headed towards them, fast. Suddenly they realised that it was very low, very low indeed, and with a bang it hit the camp perimeter fence 'between the chapel and the sentry box and hit the electricity wires.

    Sergeant Jack Dickson, recovered from his illness, was circuit-bashing when he saw it disappear below the barrack roofs of the next compound, none of which were more than fifteen feet high, Trailing a length of barbed-wire the Ju 88 roared over the French football ground and struck two Canadians, one of them - Flight Sergeant W. W. Massie RCAF - was fortunate to suffer no more than a broken leg, WO2 H. D. Mallory RCAF, however, was killed. The Ju 88 then narrowly missed a guard tower where the "Posten", seeing the aircraft heading towards him, jumped for his life and broke his thigh. The aircraft was last seen exiting 'along a vegetable garden between two compounds trailing most of the fence from his tailplane'.

    The following day the camp Kommandant told Warrant Officer Meyers that a formal complaint had already been forwarded to Higher Authority and that the pilot had been dealt with within an hour of the incident.

    See:
    Footprints On The Sands Of Time - RAF Bomber Command Prisoners-of War in Germany 1939-1945.
    Clutton-Brock,Oliver.
    London:Grub Street,2003.
    pp.91-2.

    Pete, Back to Barrington! I'm pretty sure you've seen the mention on Winston Barrington in the above reference. For others, see: pp.96 & 494 (fn.72), and, http://terrorfliegerwarlog.co.uk/page-81/

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 14th January 2020 at 08:37.

  5. #5
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    Col

    Thanks as always for your time and effort; it is very much appreciated ..... an interesting story.

    Regards (and thanks again)

    Pete
    Last edited by PeteT; 14th January 2020 at 09:47.
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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