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Thread: He 111 with V-1 bomb, November 4, 1944

  1. #11
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    Hi Jim,

    The same book as I mentioned in my last forum entry, reports on the night on 6/7 October aircraft from III/KG3 launched an attack between 19.40 and 20.25. At 19.31 25 Sqn F/L E E Marshall and F/O C A Allen flying Mosquiti XVII HK257 caught up with a Heinkel and ‘blew it to pieces’.
    No other mention of any other losses that night.

    Cheers,

    John.

  2. #12
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    Thanks John. I would be interested to know where it was shot down, relative to the bomber stream.

    Jim

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    Hi Jim,

    According to ‘Aces High’ by Christopher Shore and Clive Williams, they shot down the He111, 40 miles east of Southwold. By the way it should have read A E Marshall (Alfred Ernest). I hope that helps.

    Cheers,

    John.

  4. #14
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    Thanks again John. The time of the encounter at 1931 and the position 40 miles west of Southwold, would indicate that the Dortmund bomber force would not have observed this event. The location was well north of the return route and in any event, the force was still on their way to the target at that time. Dad's a/c bombed at 2032. The outward route was well south of this location.

    Jim

  5. #15
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    Hi Jim,

    Just out of curiosity what Sqn was your dad with and what was his mustering?

    Cheers,

    John.

  6. #16
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    John: dad (RCAF) served with 419 Squadron from September 1944 - April 1945, screened after his last operation March 25, 1945 to Hannover. Prior to that he was a flying instructor and then “instructed instructors how to instruct” prior to moving on to do training for operational service.

    Not sure what you mean by mustering, but perhaps that explains what you are asking. He did his training as a pilot in 1941, prior to going overseas.

    Jim

  7. #17
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    Hi Jim,

    My email is harleyDOT158ATbigpondDOTcom, replace the DOT & AT with the usual and we can talk I might be able to help.

    Cheers,

    John.

  8. #18
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    Probably a bit irrelevant now, but having read of the V-1 campaign using He 111 "carriers" based in the Netherlands, from about Nov 44, I got the impression that these strikes were generally flown by small groups of aircraft at very low level at night, and the crews only "popped up" to a slightly higher altitude for launching, then sank back down to low altitude . These tactics made locating these attacks extremely difficult, and several Mosquito crews were lost in attempting to manoeuvre into an attack position. Thus I could not help but wonder why one of these rather slow and heavily encumbered aircraft (the Heinkels) would even want to climb (with difficulty) into an RAF bomber stream, which often had Mosquito "escorts" by this late stage.

  9. #19
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    David: I believe that if there was an explosion in the bomber stream on the night of November 4, 1944, it was more likely from an interception of a bomber by the Nachtjagd. The force were plotted from Yarmouth and over the North Sea and were intercepted over the Dutch coast, although there is no record of there being any aircraft shot down over the North Sea.

    Jim

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