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Thread: Sending letters from station

  1. #1
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    Default Sending letters from station

    Hi all, I have a special question how the post was working on stations? Was there a special postbox for private letters where arimen can drop their letters and those were then posted in a body?
    I have a letter writen by an airmen one day in the evening and posted the other day in the eveming. The problem is that he has been killed in the meantime. So I suppose there are only two possibilities:
    1. he dropped it into the postbox at station and his letter was posted later...
    2. he left his letter in his room and some of his comrades has posted it?

    Any comments will be much appreciated

    TIA

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  2. #2
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    Pavel, Hi,
    Don't know about mail censorship in UK (yr 1.). Yr man could, just as easily, have posted a letter into the UK mail system by dropping it into the Post Box in the local village (don't know if that was ever against the "Regulations"?).
    Yr 2. is probably very unlikely. If he did not return from an Op then a special team from the Station SHQ would have taken any of his remaining effects/equipment from his room into 'protective custody'. Any official equipment, uniforms, etc, etc, would have been removed. Some could be returned to Stores for possible subsequent re-issue. Personal stuff - letters, wallet contents, etc, etc (forbidden to be taken on Op flights) would be very carefully examined. Any evidence that might cause distress to NoK (letters, etc, to/from any girl-friend might be quietly removed before the remaining items were returned to the NoK Wife) was carefully monitored. I would suggest that any such letters left in the deceased's room would NOT be posted, but carefully examined for Classified information and/or incriminating evidence. It was very delicate job!!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  3. #3
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    Hi Peter, thank you for your comments.
    1. I believe the letter was written in the evening hours when he was on readiness and he took-off for his fateful flight early in the morning so I think he was not able to leave the base. So the station postbox seems to me as the only option.
    2. I agree with you that this idea is out of question and the letter would be handed over with his estate but it is not my case as there is standard postal rubber stamp on its envelope. So I have to stick with the point 1.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  4. #4
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    In modern Officers and WOs and Sgts Messes, there is normally a box in which to drop outgoing mail. This then gets placed in the mail system by the staff. There is no reason to suggest that this wasn't in place during WW2.
    In fond memory of Corporal James Oakland AGC (RMP), killed in action in Afghanistan on 22 October 2009. Exemplo Ducemus.

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