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Thread: Wellington at Wright Field

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    Default Wellington at Wright Field

    The following video consists of three segments, the most germane to this forum being the first which includes a Wellington, Spitfire and Fairey Battle K9370 fitted with the 2,000 hp Fairey Monarch engine and electrically-controlled, contra-rotating propellers.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tMw1EVlhyo

    Does anyone know the ID of the Wellington?

    Robert

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    Default Re: Wellington at Wright Field

    Can't help with an ID, but it's mentioned in Flying Magazine, December 1941:

    https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=...eld%22&f=false

    Regards

    Simon
    Researching R.A.F. personnel from the North East of England

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    Default Re: Wellington at Wright Field

    The Dayton Daily News of 14 October 1941 doesn't ID any of the aircraft other than to say "a Hawker Hurricane, 2 place fighter plane; a Supermarine Spitfire, single seater pursuit; Boulton Paul Defiant fighter and a Vickers Wellington five place bomber"

    It goes on to mention they also had a "Junkers German bi-motored bomber and a Messerschmitt ME109, single engined, cannon equipped fighter, both of which were shot down over London"

    Regards,

    Dave

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    Default Re: Wellington at Wright Field

    Thanks, Dave and Simon.

    Am told that Wellington Z8771 was flown to Gander via Reykjavik in August 1941 so that could be the one.

    Would appreciate an A-B serial lookup.

    Robert

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    Default Re: Wellington at Wright Field

    Z8771 was a Mk IV with Pratt and Whitney Twin Wasp engines which might explain the American interest. First deliveries to RAF of this rarer mark around 6/41.
    Peter

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    Default Re: Wellington at Wright Field

    Nice video btw Rob - thanks for posting it.

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    Default Re: Wellington at Wright Field


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    Default Re: Wellington at Wright Field

    Here are the goods on the two Wellingtons to the US. Both are shown as Wellington Ic.
    Z-8771 transferred to US Army Air on July 5, 1941 and flown to the US by OADF flt.
    Z-8772 transferred to US Army Air on July 16, 1941 and flown to the US by OADF flt.
    This from the movement cards.
    Richard.k

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    Default Re: Wellington at Wright Field

    Thanks Richard, and others. Had since heard there were two aircraft so now we have them.

    Robert

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    Default Re: Wellington at Wright Field

    I doubt that the reason these Wellingtons were loaned to Uncle Sam at this time was the type of engines actually installed. Having P&W Twin Wasps fitted would have made maintenance slightly easier I guess, but it seems that this was just a British PR push into the US of A to bring the plight of the British people to the notice of Middle America, and to show off some typical British aircraft of the time. I note that the information so far presented on these aircraft does not indicate whether they were all returned to UK or otherwise. The Mk. IV Wellington was probably the least important mark in production at the time, as already mentioned, ultimately equipped very few squadrons.
    David D

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