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Thread: 400110 - Unaccounted Airmen - 10-01-1940

  1. #21
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    Default Re: 400110 - Unaccounted Airmen - 10-01-1940

    Interesting Richard, thanks for posting that. Could indeed be a red herring!

    He was 49 according to the Deaths Index Register, and the 1939 register has his D.o.B. as October 27th 1890. Could be an OCR error in the Institute of Chemistry pdf file?

    Regards

    Simon

    EDIT: a family tree on ancestry records that he was an Analytical Research Chemist at the Government Experimental Station, Porton. Born November 27th 1890.
    Last edited by wwrsimon; 28th June 2020 at 11:50.
    Researching R.A.F. personnel from the North East of England

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    Default Re: 400110 - Unaccounted Airmen - 10-01-1940

    Oh well - back to drawing board at least another name eliminated

    It is possible that Stannard was alone in the Miles and that is why no name Has ever Been found - though I have seen reference to a second person who was killed I will look at my file on this again Monday . The reason I am interested it for my bail out list

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    Default Re: 400110 - Unaccounted Airmen - 10-01-1940

    The Berkshire Aviation Museum at Woodley (https://museumofberkshireaviation.co.uk/) has a voluminous amount of stuff on all Miles a/c - including their demises!!! The last time I used them - many years ago! - they were extremely helpful!! A clue might be hidden away with them?
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  4. #24
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    Default Re: 400110 - Unaccounted Airmen - 10-01-1940

    Got some of it without paying 42

    Educated at Shawlands ,Academy and Allan Glen's School, Glasgow, he pursued his professional training at the Glasgow and West of Scotland now the Royal Technical- College, Glasgow, and was awarded the Asso ciateship of the College in 1911. In the following year, he was*he was appointed demonstrator in the Chemistry Department of the West of Scotland Agri*Agri- cultural College, and, in 1914, joined the staff of the Indo-Burmah Petro-. leum Co., Ltd., at Rangoon. On the outbreak of war, however, he returned and received a commission in the 10th Battalion, South Lancs.

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    Default Re: 400110 - Unaccounted Airmen - 10-01-1940

    Peter Moss who is the Miles expert (written 3 books of the history of company and a prod list) didn’t have a name and he would have been all over the files army Woodley - I think going through the 24 names and eliminating them all is the best way of doing that

  6. #26
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    Default Re: 400110 - Unaccounted Airmen - 10-01-1940

    UK Flight Testing Accidents 1940 to 1971 mentions only a pilot who was Forced ejected from the plane when it broke up

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    Default Re: 400110 - Unaccounted Airmen - 10-01-1940

    Here is what I have on this incident

    I am sure that Ross had access to Accident Card on this one and it only listed the Pilot - But it may be my memory at fault - It appears the source mat be The Secret Years: Flight Testing at Boscombe Down 1939-1945- I still think we need to eliminate the other 19 names just in case


    10.1.40 Master I N7422 AAEE near Boscombe Down Ab. The Secret Years: Flight Testing at Boscombe Down 1939-1945 N7422 broke up after diving at about 290 mph with the cockpit open causing the tailplane attachment to fail. The pilot baled out but the observer was "killed". There is a Roll of Honour in the appendices but it does not list the observer. OK there is a short appendix of "Senior Staff" there is no uniformed name in there lower than S/Ldr and mostly W/Cdr. None of your 3 names mentioned. There is a half page index of personnel which includes F/Off D W Stannard and that refers to an introductory chapter where in a piece about the (small number of) fatalities during test flying it says

    "...Stannard, a pre-war pilot, escaped by parachute in Jan 1940 from a Master that broke up during diving tests; his slow descent was witnessed by many on the aerodorme."
    From Miles Aircraft the Wartime Years

    c/n 1125 N7422 Taken from the assembly line and 'DeId as airframe for installation of Bristol Mercury VIII engine' to the Experimental Department on 22.6.39, to become the prototype Miles M.19 Master Mk.II. Sliding hood also fitted. First flown, by chief test pilot 'Bill' Skinner, in 10.39. Deld to A&AEE Boscombe Down 27.11.39 (the card has 29.11.39). In 12.39, it was noted that N7422 had the original hydro-mechanical pitch control of the propeller; could carry eight practice bombs and had been fitted with an anti-spin parachute. On 10.1.40, N7422 was being flown by F/O D W Stannard, 'A Flt, Performance Test Sqdn, A&AEE Boscombe Down, on full throttle diving tests with the cockpit cover open. He climbed to 15,000ft and then eased it into a dive, which was continued until the limiting rpm for the engine and an indicated airspeed of 290 mph had been reached. At about 11,000ft during the recovery from the dive, the aircraft went out of control and broke up. The structural faiure originated at the tailplane front spar attachment fitting, which sheared upwards under the influence of large aerodynamic loads and the tailplane detached. On releasing his Sutton Harness, the pilot was forcibly ejected from the aircraft and thereafter made a successful parachute, descent over Amesbury. It was considered that the tailplane may have been excited into vibration or flutter by the position of the cockpit cover. Cat.E 16.1.40. CLN recorded; Deld to O/C RAF Station Sealand 30.9.39, this, however, was in error and should have been recorded against c/n1118, N7415.

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