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Thread: Precautionary landing - description

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    Default Precautionary landing - description

    Hi all,

    I have find this in one log book of pilot while in EFTS - could anybody explain me what actions it means, what the pilot was practising?

    TIA

    Pavel

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    Hi Pavel
    Such a landing would have been carried out if the pilot considered that the a/c was unserviceable whilst in the air, or was about to be, say an engine running rough,oil pressure falling, engine temperature rising or even encountering weather that was beyond his ability to handle, so a quick landing was carried out, sometimes off an airfield, as a "Precaution" against the situation becoming worse. At a Flying Training School however it could have been pre-planned by an Instructor without the pupil's knowledge.The instructor would have cut the engine and left the pupil to find his way down to a suitable landing area within gliding distance. It would have been very rare to take it to an actual landing and the engine power would have been restored to climb away,but it did teach a technique that would work if it happened for real . My experience is post war in 1960 but I believe it was a long established exercise. There had to be at least 1 pre-warned exercise to show the pupil how to recognise and get into a suitable landing area.The essence is that it is a Precaution against something worse and the description would fit any such landing even for low fuel, as happened after some Ops or Battle damage.A landing carried out with an actual unserviceability or damage could be also referred to as a Forced Landing and sometimes the same term was used for one during training prefaced by Practice
    Regards
    Dick
    Last edited by Dick; 13th December 2007 at 21:45.

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    Dick is correct. Today the maneuver is called a "practice forced approach", since it is not flown all the way to a landing. There are, I believe, 2 types of maneuvers here:

    - engine off approaches, simulating an engine failure
    - precautionary landings, where engine power is available, but the landing is conducted into an unprepared site, for the reasons Dick mentioned. Today, much of the training for this maneuver includes selection of a suitable landing site.

    However, I'm reviewing School diaries for 31, 32 and 33 SFTS right now, and a fairly common accident mode was engine not responding, or responding slowly, when the go-around was attempted, resulting in an unplanned landing. The engine problems, at least with Harvards, mainly appear to be the result of allowing the engine to cool excessively during the approach, or from not setting the prop pitch correctly at the start of the approach. At least a few of the accidents resulted in the instructor's logbook being endorsed, for allowing these things to happen.

    My civil instructor used to require me to fly the forced approach to a frighteningly low altitude (for me, anyway), and I always remember having my hands full in the little 120 hp Cessna when power came back on and flaps came up in stages for the go-around. Add in retractable gear and a variable pitch prop, and I imagine that any engine or prop hickup at this point could be pretty frightening for a student, and sometimes even too much for a young instructor.

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    Dick and Bill - many thanks for comprehensive description!

    Pavel

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