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Thread: RAF Term N/E Sick ?

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    Default RAF Term N/E Sick ?

    N/E Sick. What does this mean when referred to Aircrew? - Does it mean Nervous Exhaustion? or Non Effective? (It seems when used for Airframes it means non effective). I am researching a Wop/AG in 97 Squadron whose last two missions had been rather harrowing on 25/26 June 1942 mission to Bremen they had managed to evade a JU 88 chasing them. Then they dodged a Second JU 88 by diving into a cloud. On his next mission 11/12 July 1942 to Danzig submarine works, they were hit by a shell at Christiansund and had to jettison bombs and abandon the mission. After this mission the AOC said the crews had put up a magnificent effort and it was a great contribution to the Naval War. However his crew had turned back and landed at a different airfield and another plane/crew was lost on the raid. Later he was N/E sick 2 Aug 1942 and then ceased to be N/E Sick and returned to the Squadron on 24 Aug 1942 and continued flying missions.

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    Default Re: RAF Term N/E Sick ?

    Hi,

    Non Effective Sick.
    In most cases the airman was posted from his squadron to the base where stationed and when OK then returned back to the squadron.

    HTH

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Researchingreg (31st August 2020)

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    Default Re: RAF Term N/E Sick ?

    Rule 1 in the RAF was (is?) that every body, and every thing, always has to be some where – at all times! And, therefore, accountable, feedable, payable, accommodatable, etc, etc. In my time in the RAF I was always paid, fed, and accommodated (some of the latter were less than salubrious! You have, clearly, never slept in the Airmans Transit Room at RAF North Weald in 1953?).
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Default Re: RAF Term N/E Sick ?

    Non-effective personnel in RAF (and other Commonwealth air forces, there would have been similar administrative arrangements in all military forces) simply meant that for some reason or other, AC2 Plonk was not available for normal duties. He could be: failed to return from operations, sick or injured, in prison or detention, AWOL, or, (often overlooked) could be "u/t" (under training). Effective personnel on the whole had to be fit, fully trained and available for duty to do their Lordship's bidding. I think that at any given time, (thinking of situation in UK, WW2 period), every station or recording unit would have a complete list of personnel on strength, including attached personnel from other units, if any, and they would all have to be classified as to their availability and effectiveness. No doubt the whole story of "effectiveness" of personnel would be covered in a section of King's Regulations and Air Council Instructions (KR&ACI), with senior medical and administrative officers in particular taking a great deal of interest in "their" personnel. Generally u/t personnel would only be present at specialised training stations (ITW, recruit deports, etc.), and the prime responsibility of such personnel was to concentrate on their training and eventually succeed by passing out as trained to the approved standard, and then take their place in the line on behalf of their country. This is just an amateurish attempt to explain the deeper meaning of this term, as I do not have a handy copy of KR&ACI to help me out at this moment!
    David D

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    Default Re: RAF Term N/E Sick ?

    On further reflection, terming aircrew of various types prior to graduation as "Non-effective" might be a step too far, but they were still in the interesting state of not being available for any other duties than completing their training, although they could, in extreme emergencies, be activated for operational duties in some other capacity. The same could be said for any other (non-flying) personnel engaged in any stage of training towards a trade, or in furtherance of this. Generally these personnel would be considered as not suitable at this time for posting to any operational units or other duties, and were more valuable kept where they were as potential future aircrew, tradesmen, etc.
    David D

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    Default Re: RAF Term N/E Sick ?

    I think that in this particular case 'Non Effective Sick' would have been a temporary removal of Aircrew Medical Category,presumably the subject Aircrew could then be either (1) receiving treatment for illness/injuries (2) sent to a rest and recuperation centre (3) sent on leave.'Which' would depend on whether he was sick due to illness,injury or nervous exhaustion/strain.

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