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Thread: Length of time of an OTU course?

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    Default Length of time of an OTU course?

    Hello All:

    Can anyone give me a rough idea of the length of an OTU course? I'm particularly after anything from 60 OTU, as I've been asked by a friend, wrt a 418 Sqn crew.

    TIA,

    Mark

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    Hi Mark,

    I think it may vary in dependence of period during the war and if it was fighter/bomber/coastal OTU.

    As I am mostly interested in bomber/coastal units I can offer you following info:
    24 OTU: 14.12.43 - 10.3.44
    i. e. three months.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Hi Mark,

    According to my Dad's log book he was at 32 OTU in New Brunswick flying Venturas from June 19 to September 8, 1942. He was then shipped back to England where he joined 487 Sqdn.

    Rob Baker

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    Here's another example for the crew that I am researching:
    joined 29 OTU Bruntingthorpe 13 June 44, posted to HCU Swinderby 11 October 44.
    Regards
    Max

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    Hi Mark,
    The time at OTU was ten weeks,this was for such as 19 OTU Kinloss which supplied Bomber Command.

    Ed ex W/Op Ag & Pilot

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    Mark - I have one for a Navigator being posted to No.14 OTU in Cottesmore Sept.8/42, then being posted out on Dec.30/42 to an HCU for 4 more weeks after that.
    Dave Wallace

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    My understanding is that courses varied in length depending on requirements. Sometimes they were shortened to two weeks, other times lengthened to over two months. See also my post of all the 57 OTU course dates in the 'Research Materials' section of this board.

    Steve
    41 (F) Squadron RAF at War and Peace, April 1916-March 1946
    http://brew.clients.ch/41sqnraf.htm

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    Many thanks all,

    Mark

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    Default 60 OTU postings

    The following notes are based on a survey of only a fraction of the RCAF awards data base but should give some notion of training time at No.60 OTU.

    Russel Bannock, already very experienced in training in Canada, was posted to No.36 OTU, Greenwood on 12 November 1943 but I am advised that this OTU gave little more than flying practice on Mosquitoes (no gunnery or tactics). He was sent overseas in January 1944. Arrived in UK, 24 February 1944. Attended No.60 OTU (11 April 1944 to June 1944).

    Richard James Bennell also had some experience in Canada as an instructor. Posted overseas 12 December 1941 and posted to No.51 OTU, 3 March 1942. To No.29 Squadron, 7 April 1942. To No.410 Squadron, 25 April 1942. To No.51 OTU, 6 October 1942 (promoted Squadron Leader that date). To No.418 Squadron, 14 December 1942. Attached to No.1530 Beam Approach Training Flight, 28 March to 2 April 1943. Posted from No.418 Squadron to No.60 OTU, 18 September 1943. To No.418 Squadron, 25 February 1944 and promoted Wing Commander. Killed in action 9 March 1944 while serving with No.418 Squadron. From his experience, I suspect his time at No.60 OTU was an an instructor rather than a pupil.

    Philip Roy Brook arrived in United Kingdom, 29 September 1941. Further trained at No.60 OTU (20 October to 23 December 1941) before posting to operations.

    Kenneth Arthur Boomer was a Spitfire pilot in 1942, flew Kittyhawks in Canada and Alaska (1942-43) and then was posted back to Britain, arriving 7 May 1944; to No.60 OTU, 13 June 1944; to No.418 Squadron, 20 August 1944.

    William Crawford Charde, another ex-instructor in Canada, disembarked in Britain, 5 September 1944. To No.60 OTU, 3 October 1944. To No.2 Group Service Unit, 21 December 1944. To No.418 Squadron, 21 January 1945.

    Arthur Reginald Carter was posted to the UK, arriving 16 August 1941. Further trained at No.60 OTU, 21 August to 21 October 1941 (Defiants) before going on to operations.

    Howard Douglas Cleveland, yet another instructor in Canada, went to No.36 OTU, Greenwood, 25 June 1943. Embarked from New York, 8 October 1943; arrived UK, 16 October 1943. Posted to No.60 OTU, 26 October 1943, he was sent to No.418 Squadron, 1 January 1944.

    Stanley Herbert Ross Cotterill also instructed in Canada . Posted to No.36 OTU, Greenwood, 29 October 1943; posted to No.1 "Y" Depot, Halifax, 15 January 19444; arrived in UK, 31 January 1944; posted to No.60 OTU, 29 February 1944; to No.418 Squadron, 2 May 1944.

    Ross Macham Gourley Currie arrived in UK, 31 August 1941. Posted to No.60 OTU, 8 September 1941; to No.151 Squadron, 11 November 1941 to 9 April 1942.

    Noel Gibbons (navigator) disembarked in United Kingdom, 11 November 1942. To No.51 OTU, 3 March 1943. To No.60 OTU, 26 May 1943. To No.418 Squadron, 14 June 1943. To No.60 OTU, 10 February 1944. To No.418 Squadron again, 1 August 1944.

    Dudley Brian Graeme AFC, after much time overseas on Anti-Aircraft Cooperation duties, was posted to No.60 OTU, 9 August 1944; to No.2 General Service Unit, 18 October 1944; to No.107 Squadron, 19 October 1944, reporting 21 October 1944.

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    Can someone please elaborate briefly on 60 OTU around mid-late 1941?

    That is, what aircraft did they train on, for what purpose, and where did pupils typically see service?

    My grandfather (RAAF) was posted to 61 OTU on arrival in the UK before posting to Fighter Command, but both his file and that of another Australian airman arriving at the same time had 60 OTU as an initial posting before that was deleted and substituted with 61 OTU.

    I'm curious as to what his career might have otherwise entailed.

    Adrian
    Interests include Spitfires in Malta 1942 and 460 Sqdn 1943-44 (including Black Thursday)

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