Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Request interpretation of Met abbreviation.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Lions Bay, BC
    Posts
    651
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 40 Times in 34 Posts

    Default Request interpretation of Met abbreviation.

    The following text is from a weather forecast for Bomber Commands operation to Chemnitz, March 5/6, 1945:

    “Route home, similar to route out except threat of rain or snow between 5 degrees east and the channel, with thick layers of Sc and As, but a good chance of a lane between 8,000 and 15,000”

    I presume "Sc" is Stratocumulus, but what does does "As" mean? Altocumulus? What are the dangers flying through this type of cloud?

    Jim
    Last edited by JDCAVE; 14th September 2021 at 19:26.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    2,733
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 29 Times in 27 Posts

    Default Re: Request interpretation of Met abbreviation.

    Jim

    Both are types of medium level cloud found between about 6500 and 18000 ft, hence the 'alto' ie Ac = Altocumulus and As = Altostratus. In most circumstances there are no particular dangers in flying through these types of cloud although moderate icing may occur should they are associated with an active front; in most cases, however, possibly the worst to be expected is rime or slight icing. There's rarely any significant turbulence. As with all types of cloud, should large numbers of aircraft be flying in the same cloud layer there is always the risk of collisions.

    Brian

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Lions Bay, BC
    Posts
    651
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 40 Times in 34 Posts

    Default Re: Request interpretation of Met abbreviation.

    Thanks Brian. Altostratus it is, then.

    Jim

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •