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Thread: "Spitfire Dive-Bombers versus the V2" by Bill Simpson.

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    Default "Spitfire Dive-Bombers versus the V2" by Bill Simpson.

    Hi all, I would like to ask if any member has this book and check something for me there or possibly anyone has a contact for the author Bill Simpson?

    TIA

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Default Re: "Spitfire Dive-Bombers versus the V2" by Bill Simpson.

    Hi Pavel I have the book...

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    Default Re: "Spitfire Dive-Bombers versus the V2" by Bill Simpson.

    Steve thank you, PM sent.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Default Re: "Spitfire Dive-Bombers versus the V2" by Bill Simpson.

    Does the book contain anything about their training in dive bombing? I know most histories ignore the training part of the subject but in some cases more squadron hours are spent on training than missions. I have just started going through the Spitfire squadrons ORBs looking for range use.

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    Default Re: "Spitfire Dive-Bombers versus the V2" by Bill Simpson.

    Hi
    Sorry I can't help really it is probably at least 12 years since I read the book and I have got a lot more grey hair now than I had then. My interest at the time was to find content regarding reconnaissance activities - reconnaissance to identify launch sites and the use of camera aircraft to accompany the bombers but there was nothing on either. The book focuses mostly on the activities of 602, 453 and 229 Sqns. 602 and 453 had both been in 2TAF so I assume they had engaged in a great deal of dive-bombing training I don't know about 229Sqn.

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    Default Re: "Spitfire Dive-Bombers versus the V2" by Bill Simpson.

    This may be off the main thread topic, but at risk of being accused of high-jacking, I submit the following as being of interest. It is from a 2006 narrative that was never published, and in turn was based on a Royal Air Force Narrative, The Liberation of North West Europe: Volume V: From the Rhine to the Baltic, 1 October 1944 - 8 May 1945, itself another unpublished study which I consulted as Directorate of History and Heritage document 86/285, pp.44-46 and 133 (back in the days when one could visit DHH).

    “Throughout the Northwest European campaign, Allied air planners also had to take account of civilian casualties - “collateral damage” is not a new problem. To cite but one example, on 21 October 1944 the Dutch air liaison officer in London advised Air Ministry that barge traffic in occupied Holland was of greater value to Dutch citizens than to German forces; most of the loads were agricultural produce vital to a populace facing what was to become known as ‘the hungry winter’. Instructions were issued on 3 November, 5 November and 23 November 1944, placing limits on attacks in specific areas including thickly populated cities.

    “However, it was difficult to adhere rigidly to these policies, especially when the enemy established V-2 rocket launching sites in urban areas, while rail and water-borne traffic became increasingly militarized. The Free Dutch government itself protested when a medium-bomber raid of 3 March 1945, intended to hit a V-2 storage and assembly site, killed numerous civilians and brought Winston Churchill himself to demand an investigation. In these circumstances, intelligence provided by the Dutch underground was especially important. Indeed, the Resistance occasionally requested strikes on urban targets that they rated as worth civil casualty risks - SS Headquarters, lock gates and railways known to be vital to the enemy.”
    Last edited by HughAHalliday; 22nd October 2021 at 12:58. Reason: spelling

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    CZ_RAF (22nd October 2021)

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