Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Releasing/jettisoning bombs from Wellington

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,427
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 13 Times in 12 Posts

    Default Releasing/jettisoning bombs from Wellington

    Hi all,

    I was checking the Pilot's Notes for Wellington and would like to ask if my following findings for bomb releasing/jettisoning are correct:

    There are following controls on the left side of cockpit:

    Bomb doors control
    Bomb master switch
    Bomb release pushbutton

    On the top:
    Bomb jettison control

    On the right side of cockpit:
    Bomb container jettison switch

    Situation one - normal bombing run, bombs released by bomb aimer/navigator:

    1. Bomb doors control - Open
    2. Bomb master switch - On
    3. Setting on bomb selector panel + distributor
    4. Bombs released by navigator
    5. Bomb doors control - Close


    Situation two - normal bombing run, bombs released by pilot:

    1. Bomb doors control - Open
    2. Bomb master switch - On
    3. Setting on bomb selector panel + distributor
    4. Bombs released by pilot by Bomb release pushbutton
    5. Bomb doors control - Close


    Situation two - jettisoning of bombs by pilot:

    1. Bomb doors control - Open
    2. used Bomb container jettison switch
    3. used Bomb jettison control
    4. Bomb doors control - Close

    Is my understanding of these procedure correct or I am wrong in any case?

    TIA

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,010
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Default

    Pavel,
    I have the Pilot's Notes for the Mk.I, IA, IC, III, X, XI, XII, XIII, XIV, and have been comparing the various versions (actually only two sets of Pilot's Notes involved, bu the second set, covering all the Hercules-powered versions, covers a lot of ground!) Actually they do have most of the bombing controls in common, although the very early aircraft did not have the bomb distributor, and most of the later aircraft had three hydraulic pumps all driven off same engine (early Mk.Is only had one pump, and another early version had two). However I am waiting to get my old computer (compatible with my printer, unlike this laptop!) back from the repair man, so if you could wait just a little longer I will give you something more detailed than this brief account.
    David D

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,427
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 13 Times in 12 Posts

    Default

    No rush David,

    I will be glad for any further comments.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,010
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Default

    Pavel,
    Hope to be getting my desktop computer back on Monday, and for less than 200 dollars too!! A miracle!!
    David D

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,010
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Default

    Pavel,
    Sorry to report that although I got my desktop computer back on Monday, it had three serious faults, including no ability to get on to the internet; all my files were "locked up" (has since been fixed), and my printer will not have anything to do with it, despite assurances that this would not be a problem. So it will be back to the servicemen tomorrow for a bit more loving attention.
    David D

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,427
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 13 Times in 12 Posts

    Default

    No problem David,
    I need it for my project with I will be finishing in Dec or Jan so no rush.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,010
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Default

    Pavel,
    Finally, I repeat my earlier post on this subject, but with most of the "missing" data now incorporated to give a clearer idea of how bombs were dropped or jettisoned from Wellington aircraft. Please note that the nomenclature of various items in the cockpit changed between the Pilot's Notes for the Mark I, IA, and IC versions of the Wellington (with Pegasus XVIII engines) and the later Hercules powered aircraft, and these also differ (sometimes greatly) form the nomenclature you use. Also note that the terms port and starboard were used in all wartime RAF Pilot's Notes rather than left and right. Where bracketed numbers appear in the quotations from the Pilot's Notes, these refer to the numbered keys in the diagrams which appear in these notes. It is also important to realize that Pilot's Notes are for the pilot alone, and do not included instructions for the Observer (Navigator/Bomb Aimer), so it is not always clear what instruments and controls the latter has access to. However it i quite apparent that the Pilot (Captain) only has normal access to the various Master switches and controls, including all control of the bomb bay doors.



    VICKERS WELLINGTON BOMB BAY DETAILS.

    Typed up 12/8/08
    Additions incorporated 12/11/08.

    The information reproduced below has been extracted from AP 1578A, Pilot’s Notes for the Wellington I, IA and IC Aeroplanes (Two Pegasus XVIII engines), which incorporate Amendment Lists 1 to 12 (last incorporated September 1941).

    From Introduction:

    Paragraph 6:- The two Pegasus XVIII engines are mounted on nacelle structures built into the main plane. Fuel is normally drawn from two pairs of main plane tanks arranged fore and aft of the main spar outboard of the engine nacelles, and from two smaller tanks carried in the engine nacelles. Overload fuel can be carried in two additional tanks installed in place of bombs in the outer bomb cells. (etc, etc)

    Paragraph 7:- Two Vickers hydraulically-operated turrets in the nose and tail are armed with Browning .303 in. guns, one being carried in the nose and two in the tail. (Note; the nominal crew of the early Wellington I was four; pilot, navigator [also acting as the front gunner and bomb aimer], wireless operator and rear gunner).
    Various alternative bomb loads are carried in three long bomb cells in the belly of the fuselage. The bomb doors are arranged in five longitudinal rows of six doors each, the outer cells possessing double doors and the central one single doors. With the exception of the foremost three doors in each outer bomb cell, which are actuated in both directions by double-acting hydraulic jacks, all the doors are opened by the action of compression springs upon the pressure being released in the single-acting hydraulic retaining jacks which are employed to close them.
    (Special note; the details of turrets above is correct only for the original Mark I Wellington; the Marks IA and IC differed in that Nash and Thompson turrets are substituted for the original Vickers turrets in the nose and tail locations, “and an additional retractable one is introduced amidships in the undersurface, all being hydraulically operated and carrying an armament of two Browning .303 in. guns each; the mid-turret is operated by an additional pump driven by the starboard engine. The provision of a further gun station increases the nominal crew complement to five.”)


    From Section One (Controls and Equipment for Pilot, and general emergency equipment and exits).

    Paragraph 47:– Bomb Door controls. With the exception of the three fore-most doors in each outer bomb cell, the bomb doors are closed by single-acting hydraulic jacks and when the hydraulic pressure is released, are self-opening under the action of compression springs; the remaining six doors are operated by double-acting jacks. The control consists of a valve handle (29), at the port side of the instrument panel, which can be rotated to the OPEN or CLOSED position upon releasing the handle lock by depressing the spring-loaded thumb knob provided. The handle is linked up with a master switch (30) so as to prevent the release of bombs until the bomb door control is in the OPEN position. Provided the bomb release master (120) on the starboard side of the cockpit is also closed, an indicator on the bomb-aimer’s switch panel is illuminated when the bomb doors are open.

    Paragraph 48 – Bomb Release control. The pilot has supervision over the bomb release master switch (120) on the bomb jettison switch unit at the starboard side of the cockpit, and also controls the bomb door master switch (see Para. 47). Provided that bombs have first been selected and fuzed by the appropriate switches on the bomb-aimer’s switch panel, the pilot can release bombs, in addition to the bomb aimer, by operating the firing key (28) at the port side of the instrument panel. A bomb loading instruction plate (64) is provided on the starboard side of the cockpit and a further loose instruction plate is contained in a stowage bag (122) further aft.

    Paragraph 49 – Bomb Jettisoning controls. A shrouded electrical bomb jettison switch (118) is provided on the switch unit at the starboard side of the cockpit but if the automatic bomb distributor system is installed this switch becomes redundant and is covered by a metal plate. In the latter case, a bomb jettison remote control handle (40) for the use of the pilot is mounted on the port side of the instrument panel. Bomb jettisoning is also under the control of the bomb-aimer.

    NOTE:- Whichever method of jettisoning is employed, the jettisoning of bomb containers, if any, must be carried out first by the bomb container jettison switch (121) adjacent to the bomb jettison switch unit, at the starboard side of the cockpit. If this is not observed, the operation of the bomb jettison controls will release the contents of only one compartment of each container and they will be “live”.

    Paragraph 50 – Pilot’s steering indicator. The steering indicator (33) at the port side of the instrument panel is employed in conjunction with the course-setting bomb sight (CSBS) and indicates to the pilot the angular divergence of the aeroplane’s course relative to the target. The indicator also possesses red and green coloured signalling lamps illuminated by separate push-switches at the bomb-aiming station.

    Paragraph 51 – Earth fault and bomb release indicator:- Selection of one or more bombs prior to their being released by the bomb-aimer, causes two lamps (119) on the jettison switch unit at the starboard side of the cockpit to become illuminated. The lamps should normally be equally bright; unequal brightness, or the fact that one lamp only is lighted, indicating an earth fault in the wiring system. On the firing switch being closed, both lamps should be extinguished, indicating that the bombs have been released, until further bombs are selected.

    Paragraph 52 – Bomb cell lamps:- Three lamps providing a measure of lighting in the bomb cells, are located at their forward end, and are controlled by a switch on the electrical system control panel. The lamps enable an observer, such as a mid-gunner, to inspect the interior of the bomb cells after the bomb load has apparently been disposed of, to guard against the possibility of any bombs accidentally remaining. It is important that these lamps should be switched off when the bomb doors are open, during night flying.

    The fuel system diagram clearly shows the two 140 Imperial Gallon overload tanks as carried in the outer bomb cells, which raise the total fuel capacity to some 1,030 gallons (normal capacity using only wing tanks is 750 Imp gallons). The approximate fuel consumption (per engine) is stated to be:-
    (Rich mixture) – 61 Imp gallons per hour @ 2,250 RPM @ + 2 1/2 pounds boost.
    (Weak mixture) – 40 Imp gallons per hour @ 2,250 RPM @ zero boost.
    (Weak mixture) – 28 Imp gallons per hour @ 1,750 RPM @ - 4 pounds boost.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,427
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 13 Times in 12 Posts

    Default

    Thanks a lot for so much typing David!
    I really appreciate it.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    David, I am sorry to resurrect this thread from the depths of the community but I am trying to identify the Wellington 1A to 1C bomb aimer panel controls and wonder if where you got your notes there may also have been a diagram to go with it?
    So far I have found one single image of a type IIa bomb aimer panel but no details of what the dials or controls actually are (or what they do). If you can't help, does anybody out there have any images/details drawings/schematics of what the parts are on the bomb aimer panel for the Wellington?

    Thanks for any help, cheers, Neil

    Quote Originally Posted by David Duxbury View Post
    Pavel,
    Finally, I repeat my earlier post on this subject, but with most of the "missing" data now incorporated to give a clearer idea of how bombs were dropped or jettisoned from Wellington aircraft. Please note that the nomenclature of various items in the cockpit changed between the Pilot's Notes for the Mark I, IA, and IC versions of the Wellington (with Pegasus XVIII engines) and the later Hercules powered aircraft, and these also differ (sometimes greatly) form the nomenclature you use. Also note that the terms port and starboard were used in all wartime RAF Pilot's Notes rather than left and right. Where bracketed numbers appear in the quotations from the Pilot's Notes, these refer to the numbered keys in the diagrams which appear in these notes. It is also important to realize that Pilot's Notes are for the pilot alone, and do not included instructions for the Observer (Navigator/Bomb Aimer), so it is not always clear what instruments and controls the latter has access to. However it i quite apparent that the Pilot (Captain) only has normal access to the various Master switches and controls, including all control of the bomb bay doors.



    VICKERS WELLINGTON BOMB BAY DETAILS.

    Typed up 12/8/08
    Additions incorporated 12/11/08.

    The information reproduced below has been extracted from AP 1578A, Pilot’s Notes for the Wellington I, IA and IC Aeroplanes (Two Pegasus XVIII engines), which incorporate Amendment Lists 1 to 12 (last incorporated September 1941).

    From Introduction:

    Paragraph 6:- The two Pegasus XVIII engines are mounted on nacelle structures built into the main plane. Fuel is normally drawn from two pairs of main plane tanks arranged fore and aft of the main spar outboard of the engine nacelles, and from two smaller tanks carried in the engine nacelles. Overload fuel can be carried in two additional tanks installed in place of bombs in the outer bomb cells. (etc, etc)

    Paragraph 7:- Two Vickers hydraulically-operated turrets in the nose and tail are armed with Browning .303 in. guns, one being carried in the nose and two in the tail. (Note; the nominal crew of the early Wellington I was four; pilot, navigator [also acting as the front gunner and bomb aimer], wireless operator and rear gunner).
    Various alternative bomb loads are carried in three long bomb cells in the belly of the fuselage. The bomb doors are arranged in five longitudinal rows of six doors each, the outer cells possessing double doors and the central one single doors. With the exception of the foremost three doors in each outer bomb cell, which are actuated in both directions by double-acting hydraulic jacks, all the doors are opened by the action of compression springs upon the pressure being released in the single-acting hydraulic retaining jacks which are employed to close them.
    (Special note; the details of turrets above is correct only for the original Mark I Wellington; the Marks IA and IC differed in that Nash and Thompson turrets are substituted for the original Vickers turrets in the nose and tail locations, “and an additional retractable one is introduced amidships in the undersurface, all being hydraulically operated and carrying an armament of two Browning .303 in. guns each; the mid-turret is operated by an additional pump driven by the starboard engine. The provision of a further gun station increases the nominal crew complement to five.”)


    From Section One (Controls and Equipment for Pilot, and general emergency equipment and exits).

    Paragraph 47:– Bomb Door controls. With the exception of the three fore-most doors in each outer bomb cell, the bomb doors are closed by single-acting hydraulic jacks and when the hydraulic pressure is released, are self-opening under the action of compression springs; the remaining six doors are operated by double-acting jacks. The control consists of a valve handle (29), at the port side of the instrument panel, which can be rotated to the OPEN or CLOSED position upon releasing the handle lock by depressing the spring-loaded thumb knob provided. The handle is linked up with a master switch (30) so as to prevent the release of bombs until the bomb door control is in the OPEN position. Provided the bomb release master (120) on the starboard side of the cockpit is also closed, an indicator on the bomb-aimer’s switch panel is illuminated when the bomb doors are open.

    Paragraph 48 – Bomb Release control. The pilot has supervision over the bomb release master switch (120) on the bomb jettison switch unit at the starboard side of the cockpit, and also controls the bomb door master switch (see Para. 47). Provided that bombs have first been selected and fuzed by the appropriate switches on the bomb-aimer’s switch panel, the pilot can release bombs, in addition to the bomb aimer, by operating the firing key (28) at the port side of the instrument panel. A bomb loading instruction plate (64) is provided on the starboard side of the cockpit and a further loose instruction plate is contained in a stowage bag (122) further aft.

    Paragraph 49 – Bomb Jettisoning controls. A shrouded electrical bomb jettison switch (118) is provided on the switch unit at the starboard side of the cockpit but if the automatic bomb distributor system is installed this switch becomes redundant and is covered by a metal plate. In the latter case, a bomb jettison remote control handle (40) for the use of the pilot is mounted on the port side of the instrument panel. Bomb jettisoning is also under the control of the bomb-aimer.

    NOTE:- Whichever method of jettisoning is employed, the jettisoning of bomb containers, if any, must be carried out first by the bomb container jettison switch (121) adjacent to the bomb jettison switch unit, at the starboard side of the cockpit. If this is not observed, the operation of the bomb jettison controls will release the contents of only one compartment of each container and they will be “live”.

    Paragraph 50 – Pilot’s steering indicator. The steering indicator (33) at the port side of the instrument panel is employed in conjunction with the course-setting bomb sight (CSBS) and indicates to the pilot the angular divergence of the aeroplane’s course relative to the target. The indicator also possesses red and green coloured signalling lamps illuminated by separate push-switches at the bomb-aiming station.

    Paragraph 51 – Earth fault and bomb release indicator:- Selection of one or more bombs prior to their being released by the bomb-aimer, causes two lamps (119) on the jettison switch unit at the starboard side of the cockpit to become illuminated. The lamps should normally be equally bright; unequal brightness, or the fact that one lamp only is lighted, indicating an earth fault in the wiring system. On the firing switch being closed, both lamps should be extinguished, indicating that the bombs have been released, until further bombs are selected.

    Paragraph 52 – Bomb cell lamps:- Three lamps providing a measure of lighting in the bomb cells, are located at their forward end, and are controlled by a switch on the electrical system control panel. The lamps enable an observer, such as a mid-gunner, to inspect the interior of the bomb cells after the bomb load has apparently been disposed of, to guard against the possibility of any bombs accidentally remaining. It is important that these lamps should be switched off when the bomb doors are open, during night flying.

    The fuel system diagram clearly shows the two 140 Imperial Gallon overload tanks as carried in the outer bomb cells, which raise the total fuel capacity to some 1,030 gallons (normal capacity using only wing tanks is 750 Imp gallons). The approximate fuel consumption (per engine) is stated to be:-
    (Rich mixture) – 61 Imp gallons per hour @ 2,250 RPM @ + 2 1/2 pounds boost.
    (Weak mixture) – 40 Imp gallons per hour @ 2,250 RPM @ zero boost.
    (Weak mixture) – 28 Imp gallons per hour @ 1,750 RPM @ - 4 pounds boost.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,010
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Default

    Neil,
    Sorry to say, but the Pilot's notes for the Wellington are definitely that - for the pilot only, so not a lot on the jobs and equipment used by other crew members. You might well have to get in contact with groups familiar with the technical features of the Wellington, included installed equipment such as bomb sights, and bomb aimer's panel of instruments. I think that there will be members of this Board who could offer advice on where such information could be found. Probably there will also be some good photos of the bomb aiming station, and these would normally have been taken for official purposes for manuals, etc, that may have been published in books, but again I cannot make any specific suggestions as to which books these might be.
    David D

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •