Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Fairey Battle 40 Sqn Naseby Reservoir, Northamptonshire

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,860
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 79 Times in 72 Posts

    Default Fairey Battle 40 Sqn Naseby Reservoir, Northamptonshire

    Not much to go on, but can anyone identity the aircraft involved in this incident?

    http://www.husbandsbosworth.info/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=15&Itemi d=46

    "Fairey Battle of 40 Squadron made forced landing on Naseby Reservoir. Crew rescued by rowing boat"

    If the Sqn is correct has to be timeline: July 1938-December 1939

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    1,319
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts

    Default

    Paul

    K9306 14/7/39

    regards

    DaveW

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,860
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 79 Times in 72 Posts

    Default

    Dave

    Wow - That was not much to go on and you found it

    Thanks

    Paul

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Bewdley, UK
    Posts
    2,703
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Hi Paul,

    I confirm DaveW's details.

    Had a look at this as a possible fresh water recovery a few years ago.

    Pilot P/O J E Edwards and two crew safe

    Took off tasked with low level attacks on targets. Suffered an engine failure. Vision obscured by glycol fumes. Ditched into Naseby Reservoir, Northamptonshire when no suitable landing field was found. Rescued by boat (resevoir superintendant).

    Court of Inquiry. No. A 8520/39
    The Intellectual Property contained in this message has been assigned specifically to this web site.
    Copyright Ross McNeill 2015/2018 - All rights reserved.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,860
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 79 Times in 72 Posts

    Default

    Ross

    Thanks for the details

    "Had a look at this as a possible fresh water recovery a few years ago."

    So it is still there then?? :-)

    Paul

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Bewdley, UK
    Posts
    2,703
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Evidence for removal by a MU is patchy and no details of extent of recovery carried out.

    I did a quick and dirty sonar search and found nothing proud of bottom.

    Lot of silt on bottom so concluded that any further searches needed a sub-bottom profiler which is a complex bit of kit to hire and deploy.

    Although Res is not drinking water it is part of Waterways Board supplies for a number of leisure canals and is a sport fishery so it is not subject to frequency of normal drain/refil actions.

    From memory last drain was 1960s but I could not locate the report from the consultant.

    Currently not in my top 10 of best bet UK fresh water recovery sites.

    Regards
    Ross
    The Intellectual Property contained in this message has been assigned specifically to this web site.
    Copyright Ross McNeill 2015/2018 - All rights reserved.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,860
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 79 Times in 72 Posts

    Default

    Ross

    Thanks

    BTW "Currently not in my top 10 of best bet UK fresh water recovery sites."

    Maybe - But do any of those top 10 contain an ultra rare Battle ?

    Paul

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    3,660
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts

    Default

    And did, one might ask, this Reservoir Superintendant get any recognition for his ASR activities?
    I speak as one who has been "assisted" by an MCU Unit from a 'drowned' Landrover.
    One could only, normally, get from Durness (where we were all accommodated) to Fariad Head (where we were doing the trials on the UK's laser guided bomb) without going across the tidal sand-dunes. The RAF/MoD "Experts" coukl only start their Bizz if we, the Met Men, had done our bizz before. We (the Met) had to be there 2, or 3, hrs before "Play Started". Nobody told us about the deep rivulettes across the beach. Barely light, and my Landrover stalled with water up to floor-boards. MCU Unit, moored a couple of hundred yards offshore, just waking up, yawning, and putting coffee-pot on, had to effect rescue!!
    I am prepared to disclose who, what, and where, were responsible - but I doubt if there is enough "gelt" to enable me to do the necessary disclosing. My lips are sealed!!!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,956
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Paul,

    Edwards was a New Zealander serving in the RAF on a short service commission. He was killed on ops with 40 Sqn on 15 May 40.

    David Gunby's excellent history of the squadron - 'Sweeping the Skies' - provides a first hand account of the reservoir incident:

    "...Edwards suffered an engine coolant leak. The leak became progressively worse until the coolant tank collapsed completely and hot glycol poured over the engine. Bill Oxley writes:

    ‘The smoke was so bad that we couldn’t' see each other and the other two lads in the formation told me afterwards that they could swear we were on fire. The fumes were obviously affecting the pilot as well and he looked for somewhere to put down. As it turned out the only place he could find was a reservoir near Naseby. My mate who was flying in No. 2 said we did a perfect crash landing. Wheels up, flaps down, coarse pitch and hit!!’

    Bill Oxley continues:

    ‘Beat. [Sgt Beattie] was flung out of the aircraft and disappeared under the port wing. I was going through the procedures for a ditching, and when I looked up, he was clinging to the wing blowing like porpoise. His harness had caught in the pitot tube and he had just managed to extricate himself. Now comes the interesting part. We expected the aircraft to sink completely, but it didn't. The nose sank and then stopped as the prop hit solid ground under the water. The rest of the aircraft sank only so far and eventually all three of us were standing on the fuselage hanging onto the fixed aerial.’

    How lucky they were, they learned when their rescuer informed them that they had landed on the only shallow area in the reservoir."

    Very likely that the aircraft was recovered, then, given the shallow water site?

    Errol

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,860
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 79 Times in 72 Posts

    Default

    Errol, thanks for supplying full crew and incident details - yes looks like she would have been recovered if so shallow.

    Prehaps local newspapers may confirm. Not wartime so no need for censorship

    Paul

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •