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Thread: Mont Fleury Coastal Battery, Normandy

  1. #11
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    hello,

    Yes the five first Squadrons mentioned were all targeted against Mont Fleury. The other Squadrons of No. 4 Group were dispatched against Maisy [there's actually a memorial at Grandcamps-Maisy, which was unveiled circa 1994, for the french heavy bomber Squadrons, 346 and 347 from Elvington, the former having operated against that target that night.
    Breakdown is :
    16 of 77
    23 of 158
    15 of 466
    26 of 102
    14 of 346
    6 of 640

    101 attacked primary, 5 were abortive not above enemy territory, 4 failed to start.

    The other coastal guns were attacked by other groups. I know Houlgate was attacked by No. 7 Squadron, but this unit was a pathfinder.

    Joss

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    Thank you Dave, thank you Joss.
    Dave, yes please, I would like to learn the numbers of the other targets that night. Thank you.
    Norman

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    Default Mont Fleury battery pictures

    Thanks all for this detailed info, it will help greatly with my project for the students.

    Here is a link to the Atlantik Wall site, with photos of the battery.

    http://www.atlantikwall.org.uk/montfleury

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    Thank you for the lead. I have looked at this site but found the description of Mont Fleury a little ambiguous. I have hitherto understood that H.M.S. Orion, part of 'Force G' opened up first on 'Mont Fleury' scoring a direct hit followed by H.M.S. Belfast, also 'Force G' opening up on the rear battery at 'Ver sur Mer'. These actions were after the earlier RAF air raid. There was no further action from the enemy batteries.

    Does anyone know if Sergeant Major Stan Hollis, Green Howards, who won the V.C. taking the battery later that morning, is commemorated in any way in 'Mont Fleury' today?

    Norman
    Last edited by namrondooh; 27th November 2008 at 07:28.

  5. #15
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    Default Coastal Battery Targets - June 5/6 1944

    Here is the information I have for the first 3 targets:

    Crisbecq (Fontenay) 23:35
    Plan of attack: Controlled Oboe ground marking with Master Bomber directing the attack and dropping greens if necessary. Main Force was to bomb the red Oboe TIs unless directed otherwise. 101 aircraft were dispatched, 94 attacked.. There were 47 Lancaster Is and 49 Lancaster IIIs from 1 Group forming the main force, the Oboe marking which was done by 2 Mosquito IXs and 1 Mosquito XVI of 105 Squadron and 2 Mosquito XVIs of 109 Squadron. 3 of the 5 Oboe markers had Oboe equipment failures.
    Bombing was reported as concentrated.

    St Martin de Varreville 23:50
    Plan of attack: Controlled Oboe ground marking with Master Bomber directing the attack and dropping greens if necessary. Main Force was to bomb the red Oboe TIs unless directed otherwise. 100 aircraft were dispatched, 99 attacked. There were 35 Lancaster Is and 60 Lancaster IIIs of 1 Group. The Oboe marking which was done by 2 Mosquito IXs and 1 Mosquito XVI of 105 Squadron and 2 Mosquito XVIs of 109. All 5 marked successfully from 30,000 and 22,000. Bombing was reported as concentrated

    Merville (Sallennelles) 00:30
    Plan of attack: Oboe groundmarking with emergency H2S groundmarking, Oboe Mosquitoes were to release red TIs and PFF Emergency Blind Markers were to release green TIs if no Oboe markers were visible but to hold them if markers were visible. Backers up were to aim their greens at the reds, or the AP itself if it were visible.
    The main force was 13 Lancaster Xs, 71 Halifax IIIs and 15 Halifax {Mk I, I presume} from 6 Group. There were 5 Lancaster IIIs from 8 Group to back up the Oboe marking which was again done by the only Oboe squadrons 105 & 109. 105 sent 2 Mosquito XVIs and 1 Mk.IX, 109 sent 2 Mk XVIs. 3 of the 5 Oboe crews marked successfully, two had Oboe equipment failures. Bombing was reported as concentrated.

    I will send the rest later.
    If you want to figure out the likely squadrons for any target, do an advanced search in google using the search domain address as www.airforce.ca, then enter the target name (try all variations). It will bring up entries for the RCAF Honours and Awards for men who participated in the raid and give you a Squadron (usually).
    Dave Wallace

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    Dave,

    Thank you very much for your time and effort in supplying this information. I'm most grateful. Also, thank you for the tip.

    Norman

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    Default Coastal Battery Targets - June 5/6 1944 - Part 2

    La Pernelle 03:20
    Plan of attack: Oboe groundmarking and emergency visual marking. 5 Oboe Mosquitos were to drop red TIs (although it appears that all Oboe Mosquitoes marking every gun battery that night was actually loaded with 3 red and 1 green 250 lb. target indicators). If the Oboe aircraft failed, 5 Group Mosquitoes were to mark the aiming point with red spot fires. In either case, 5 Group Lancasters (S.A.B.S.) were to back up with green TIs. 131 aircraft were dispatched, 115 attacked. 5 Group sent 43 Lancaster Is, 79 Lancaster IIIs and 4 Mosquito IVs. Oboe marking was done carried out at both 30,000 and 22,000 by 2 Mosquito XVIs of 109 Squadron and 2 Mosquito XVIs and one Mk.IX from 105 Squadron. The first makers were scattered but soon there were 2 reds and 2 greens burning on the aiming point with the bombing concentrated around them. 4 of the 5 Oboe crews were successful.

    Maisy 03:35
    Plan of attack: Controlled Oboe ground marking with Master Bomber directing the attack and dropping greens if necessary. Main Force was to bomb the red Oboe TIs unless directed otherwise.116 aircraft were dispatched, 112 attacked. The main force was 93 Halifax IIIs and 15 Halifax (Is ?) of 4 Group. 8 Group sent 5 Lancaster IIIs to back up the Oboe TIs . Oboe marking was done by 1 Mosquito XVI and 2 Mk.IXs of 105 Squadron and 2 Mosquito IXs of 109 Squadron. All 5 marked successfully. Bombing was reported as concentrated

    Houlgate 03:50
    Plan of attack: Oboe groundmarking with emergency H2S groundmarking, Oboe Mosquitoes were to release red TIs and PFF Emergency Blind Markers were to release green TIs if no Oboe markers were visible but to hold them if markers were visible. Backers up were to aim their greens at the reds, or the AP itself if it were visible.
    There were 116 aircraft dispatched, 113 attacked. The main force was 106 Halifax IIIs of 6 Group, 8 Group sent 5 Lancasters to back up the Oboe marking, 105 squadron sent 1 Mosquito XVI and one Mk IX, while 109 Squadron sent 2 Mosquito XVIs and 1 Mk IX
    to do the Oboe marking from 30,000 & 22,000. 4 of the Oboe crews marked successfully. The early reds fell on the battery and to the NE.

    Mont Fleury 04:35 already covered earlier

    I'll post the remainder in a few hours.
    Dave

  8. #18
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    Norman, Joss

    Although 78 Squadron are shown as being tasked to provide 24 crews to attack Mont Fleury only 23 crews actually took part as one aircraft, that captained by Flying Officer Warn was aborted during take off due to oil build up in the engines caused by excessive ground running while the crew and ground crew attempted to fix a problem with the Rampillar seat catch. The remaining aircraft were carrying a bomb load of 11,000lb made up of either 9 x 1,000lb HC and 4 x 500lb HC or 7 x 1,000lb HC and 8 x 500lb GP. I haven't been able to identify the actual breakdown by aircraft. The crews reported that the Red TI's were well concentrated but the Green TI's were scattered either side of the Red's in a line running North - South.

    Regards

    Daz
    Last edited by 78SqnHistory; 26th November 2008 at 20:14.

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    Default Coastal Battery Targets - June 5/6 1944 - Part 3

    Longues 04:40
    Plan of attack: Oboe groundmarking with emergency H2S groundmarking, Oboe Mosquitoes were to release red TIs and PFF Emergency Blind Markers were to release green TIs if no Oboe markers were visible but to hold them if markers were visible. Backers up were to aim their greens at the reds, or the AP itself, if it were visible.
    99 aircraft were dispatched and 96 attacked. 6 Group sent 7 Lancaster Xs and 18 Lancaster IIs, 8 Group sent 69 Lancaster III, almost all equipped with bombs instead of target indicators. Oboe marking was done by 3 Mosquito XVIs of 109 Squadron and 1 Mosquito XVI and 1 Mk. IX of 105 Squadron – 4 of the 5 Oboe Crews marked successfully, the other had an Oboe equipment failure. Bombing was reported as concentrated. 1 Aircraft missing

    Pointe du Hoc (St. Pierre du Mont; Pointe du Hoe) 04:50
    Plan of attack: Oboe groundmarking and emergency visual marking. 5 Oboe Mosquitoes were to drop red [& green] TIs. If the Oboe aircraft failed, 5 Group Mosquitoes were mark the aiming point visually using green TIs. 124 aircraft were dispatched, 114 attacked. 5 Group sent 51 Lancaster Is, 64 Lancaster IIIs and 4 Mosquitoes (627 Squadron). 8 Group provided the 5 Oboe Mosquitoes, 2 Mk. XVIs and 1 Mk. IX from 109 Squadron and 2 Mosquito Mk. IXs from 105 Squadron. 3 of the Oboe marked successfully, 1 from 30,000’ on a heading of 62 degrees and 2 marked from 18,000’ from the opposite direction on a heading of 242 degrees. The first target indicators were released from 30,000’ at 04:46.50 by 109 Squadron’s “HS-R” (F/L W.G Foxall/ F/O A.C. Wallace). Their 3 red TIs were plotted to land 160 yds. north of the aiming point, while their single green TI was plotted 70 yds. NW of the AP. 105 Squadron’s “GB-H” (F/L Gordon / F/L Strachan) released their TIs at 04:47.48 from 18,000’ and they were plotted to land 140 yds. West of AP. 8 seconds later 109’s “HS-T” (S/L P.A. Kleboe / S/L J.E. Jefferson) released their TIs, their 3 reds landing 220 yds. SE of the AP while their green TI landed 240 yds. S of the aiming point. The Mosquitoes of 627 Squadron backed up the Oboe markers. Bombing was very concentrated and the TIs were well packed around the aiming point. While there was cloud at 10,000’ causing icing it began to break up near H-Hour which was close to dawn. My father was Navigator in 109 Squadron’s “HS-R” and after their markers were dropped they turned out across the channel and saw hundreds of ships below them and only then knew the Invasion was about to begin once they saw the armada. They had not been told anything about the Invasion at their briefing earlier that day
    Squadrons involved were: 105,109, 463,467, 97, 50,106, 627 . 3 aircraft missing

    Ouisterham 05:05

    Plan of attack: Oboe groundmarking with emergency H2S groundmarking, Oboe Mosquitoes were to release red TIs and PFF Emergency Blind Markers were to release green TIs if no Oboe markers were visible but to hold them if markers were visible. Backers up were to aim their greens at the reds, or the AP itself, if it were visible.
    116 aircraft were dispatched, 114 attacked. The Main Force was from 3 Group who sent 50 Lancaster Is, 21 Lancaster IIs & 35 Lancaster IIIs. The Pathfinder Force sent 5 Lancaster IIIs to back up the Oboe marking. Oboe marking was done by 105 Squadron who sent 1 Mosquito XVI and one Mk. IX, 109 Squadron sent 2 Mk.XVIs and one Mk. IX. 3 of the 5 Oboe crews marked successfully, two had Oboe equipment failures. The Oboe marking was carried out from 30,000’ and 18,000’. The first four groups of markers were scattered 500 to 2,500 yards to the east of the aiming point. At H+2 however a tight cluster of 3 TIs was burning immediately south of the aiming point and these attracted some of the bombing.

    I have other information such as bomb loads etc. and a map of the routes used if anyone wants them.

    Dave
    Last edited by David Wallace; 27th November 2008 at 15:58.

  10. #20
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    Default Battery at Longues information please

    Hello Dave

    "I have other information such as bomb loads etc. and a map of the routes used if anyone wants them."

    If you have the information specifically for Longues I would be very much interested - if not I will accept whatever you have for the nights raids.

    If it is too much to place on this board I would be grateful if you can send it to me directly at allan(dot)hillman(at)btinternet(dot)com.

    dfuller might also like to arrange visits to the battery at Longues as 441 squadron RCAF was nearby at B.11 Longues and also B.2 Bazenville is not too far away - home of 127 RCAF Wing.

    I can send him photos of the memorials at both locations if he is interested?

    many thanks

    Allan
    Allan Hillman

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