Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Dive bombing exercise after VE Day

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    1,231
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Dive bombing exercise after VE Day

    I have a member of 412 Sqn who was killed 10 June 1945. His death registration says he was killed in a flying accident during a dive-bombing exercise. I am wondering why his squadron was still doing bombing exercises after VE-Day and where in England 412 Sqn was at this point. I know they were at two airfields in Germany during the closing days of the war but he appears to have been in England. He was buried at Brookwoods.

    P/O John Edward Taylor J/92987

    I assume he was flying a Spitfire but is dive-bombing an accurate description of what he was doing at the time?

    Were they possibly training in preparation for going to the Pacific?
    David

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Berkshire
    Posts
    584
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    According to 'RAF Squadrons' - Jefford, 412 Squadron were at Warmwell, Dorset, from 6 June to 20 June 1945. They were operating with the Spitfire XVIE but during June 45 changed to the Spitfire XIV.

    Regards
    Peter
    Last edited by peter; 30th December 2008 at 16:19.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Bristol, England
    Posts
    1,319
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts

    Default

    Spitfire XVI SM414 of 412S dig Nottington Weymouth on 10/6/45, pilot JE Taylor killed. According to 'The Price of Peace' he was, as you say, practicing dive bombing when the a/c suffered a catastrophic engine failure and control was lost. If I recall correctly Spit XVIs were widely used as dive bombers in the latter stages of the war.

    regards

    DaveW

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,311
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Default

    Hi David

    RAF Warmwell was home to 17 APC (Armament Practice Camp), which 'my' 41 Squadron attended in March and August 1945 (i.e. also after VE Day, and there were never any plans for 41 Squadron to go to the Pacific). They held practice courses on dive-bombing, air-to-ground firing and air-to-air firing, which appear to have been a part of the usual curriculum, and all squadrons attended at various times.

    Warmwell has an ORB in TNA AIR 28/888, which should contain details of 412 Squadron's arrival, activity and departure, and of course the fatal flying accident you refer to.

    Hope this helps
    Regards
    Steve
    41 (F) Squadron RAF at War and Peace, April 1916-March 1946
    http://brew.clients.ch/41sqnraf.htm

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    1,231
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Thanks Dave and Steve, I have now found the notation on spitfires web site too. What still puzzles me, though, is why they were still practising when the war in Europe was over? With the known risks of flying accidents (I amazed at how many of my Malvern grads were killed in them) and everyone's enthusiasm for the war ending, you'd think they would have ceased and desisted by then. I was just reading in another thread that training stopped pretty abruptly once it was over.
    David

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Canada, eh
    Posts
    1,217
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    David, we know today that the German military was pretty well destroyed by VE day, but at the time this was not as clear. A considerable standing force was maintained in Europe in case things flared up again. Several RCAF squadrons from 2 TAF were part of this, and were kept in Europe, fully equipped and trained, until March 1946.

    This standing force probably also helped keep the Russians in place immediately after VE day.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    1,231
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Thanks Bill, that makes a lot of sense. I did note that the squadron was based in Germany until '46 when I looked it up but since he was in England at the time of the accident, I was curious about while they were still training. But I realize now, as an operational squadron, they only at Warmwell for a special course before going back into the rota in Europe.
    David

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,546
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 15 Times in 14 Posts

    Default

    Hi David,

    not directly connected with you man but there was a similar case:
    W/O LANDSMANN J. of 310 (Czech) Sq died on 15/06/1945 when his Spitfire collided with another one in training dogfight over the sea with American Mustangs. Second pilot baled out at was picked up by ASR.
    According to my sources the Czech pilots were giving some training to young Americans who were supposed to be posted to the Far East into the war against Japan.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Canada, eh
    Posts
    1,217
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Just to add some information about the need for occupation forces in Germany after VE day: Another post by David has sent me to the 21 June 1945 issue of the Toronto Star, free on-line for a limited time, which has this quote from Field Marshall Montgomery on page 1:

    "21st Army Headquarters Germany, June 21 - A warning that Nazi Germany is not "down and out" but only on its knees was voiced by British Field Marshall Montgomery today.

    The next two or three months will be the testing period of a possible German revival, Montgomery said. He added that SS troops are likely to be kept in prison cages for 20 years."

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    1,231
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default An air show?

    Well, having discovered the Toronto Star pages of the past for 1945 in another thread, I ran this pilot through the search and found a story about his death from injuries after his Spitfire crashed, according to the news account, in an "air show" demonstrating dive bombing. I can understand our line of thinking on the war not being over, etc. but is this possible barely a month after the war ended?

    To quote the story: "P/O John Edward Taylor, who left Germany to participate in an air show in England..."

    The crash occurred on June 9 and he died the next day.
    David

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •