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Thread: Habbaniya 1958

  1. #1
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    Default Habbaniya 1958

    Hi guys

    One for former RAF National Servicemen!

    Habbaniya 1958, although handed over to Iraq, saw groups of RAF servicemen on detachment from Cyprus (and possibly elswhere) to assist the RIrAF. On the occasion of the assassination of Iraq's King Feisal II in July 1958, a number of RAF servicemen were 'arrested' and held for several weeks.

    Apparently a number of 'royalists' were executed at Habbaniya and their heads displayed on poles. Who were these unfortunate victims of the revolution?

    Does anyone have any information whatsoever?

    Cheers and HNY

    Brian
    Last edited by brian; 31st December 2008 at 14:43.

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    Hi Brian, just a few notes:

    While googling it seems to me that the correct transcription is "Habbaniya".

    About your question Wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_iraq#Iraqi_republic) said:

    Inspired by Nasser, officers from the Nineteenth Brigade known as "Free Officers", under the leadership of Brigadier Abd al-Karīm Qāsim (known as "az-Za`īm", 'the leader') and Colonel Abdul Salam Arif overthrew the Hashimite monarchy on 14 July 1958. King Faisal II and `Abd al-Ilāh were executed in the gardens of ar-Rihāb Palace. Their bodies (and those of many others in the royal family) were displayed in public. Nuri as-Said evaded capture for one day, but after attempting to escape disguised as a veiled woman, he was caught and shot.

    Hope this helps a little (although this is not good theme for NY start:-)

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Brian,
    I went "In" to Nat Svc in Oct 54, so I came "Out" in Oct 56. I had to do some time in the (whatever) Reserve. If the Soft Brown Stuff had hit the Revolving Air-Conditioning I was to report to RAF Rufforth. At the time of the assassination I was a civilian meteorologist but posted to an RAF station - and, therefore, privy to info that was not being bandied about in the media. I can remember coming off a night-shift and thinking "I must really look up where RAF Rufforth actually is!".
    Sri not to be of more help!
    Rgds
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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