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Thread: Wing tip/navigation lights

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    Default Wing tip/navigation lights

    I apologise for this being outside the normal time-frame of this forum, but can anyone advise as to when wing tip, or navigation, lights first became standard fittings on RAF aircraft?

    Brian

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    This 1922 article discusses the introduction of navigation lights, internal and external. Hope that's a start Brian:

    http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1922/1922%20-%200091.html

    A

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    Thank you Amrit but it's a bit general and not what I'm really looking for. My particular interest is in the Handley Page 0/400 - I'm reading a book in which the story-teller records "The red and green wingtip identification lights glowed brightly in the rainy darkness."

    From other things that are included in the book I get a very strong feeling that his memory is proving false and I think this is another instance. I've looked at a number of photos of the aircraft, and whilst their quality is not perfect I've yet to see anything vaguely resembling wingtip lights.

    Brian

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    When is the book set?

    Here is a 1919 Flight page which specifies the layout of lights as set out in the Air Navigation Acts of 1911 to 1919.

    http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1919/1919%20-%200608.html
    http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1919/1919%20-%200609.html
    http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1919/1919%20-%200610.html

    So if the 0/400 was civil operated after that time or after military service then it may have been retrofitted with said lights?

    Narrow the years and search through it.

    A report on 1912 air law discussions mentions the coloured lights but the rules for aeroplanes is a little ambiguous I think.
    http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1912/1912%20-%200633.html
    Last edited by dennis_burke; 3rd January 2009 at 02:33.
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

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    Thank you Dennis, but again it doesn't really answer the question.

    My original post was poorly worded and unclear. The book is 'Darkness shall be my cover' which the cover jacket describes as 'the true story of 2/Lt Leslie Blacking, a nineteen year old pilot serving with 207 Sqn' (flying HP0/400s during the summer and autumn of 1918) - which is rather at odds with the introduction that describes the book as a novel based on Blacking's experiences, not exactly the same thing.

    The style very much reminds me of the Biggles books and doesn't stand to close scrutiny; one of the sentences that I was trying to check was "The red and green wingtip identification lights glowed brightly in the rainy darkness." I've been unable to spot any wingtip lights on any of the WW1 aircraft photos I've seen, which led me to to pose the question 'when were they introduced'.

    I posted the same question on the Aerodrome forum, but have had no response.

    On yet another forum someone has (incorrectly) used the book as a reference in respect of meteorological activity during WW1 and I'm on very safe ground there - but I wanted to point out that the book is in error in other respects as well.

    Brian

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