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Thread: 'Moths' at No. 4 Wireless School, Burtch, Ontario

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    Default 'Moths' at No. 4 Wireless School, Burtch, Ontario

    Can someone please confirm that 'Moths' serving with the above unit were Tiger Moths. RCAF serials included 4902, 4912, 4932 and 4997.
    Thanks and regards:
    Robert

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    Default Menasco Moths

    4902, 4912, and 4932 were Menasco Moths, assigned to No. 4 Wirelesss School which was based at Guelph. I think Burtch was a relief field for this school. 4997 was a straight Tiger, originally assigned to No. 20 EFTS at Oshawa, and later with No. 1 EFTS at Malton.

    There is some information on these aircraft on 2 of my pages,
    http://www.ody.ca/~bwalker/RCAF_4900_4949_detailed.html and http://www.ody.ca/~bwalker/RCAF_4950_5000_detailed.html, plus I have a bit more individual info if you need it.
    Last edited by Bill Walker; 20th December 2007 at 21:55. Reason: thpelling error

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    Many thanks, Bill. I had never heard of a Menasco Moth. And indeed I see the word 'Menasco' in the logbook against the types flown. For those who also have not heard of this variant, here is a an extract from the Canadian Air Museum web site:

    'In the event that U-boat attacks caused a break in supply of British-made engines to Canada, American-built Menasco engines were installed in some Canadian-built Tiger Moths. This is the major difference between the Menasco and Tiger Moths. Because this engine could drive a large generator, most Menasco Moths were used for radio training.

    The Menasco engine was not as powerful as the Gypsy engine, resulting in a somewhat reduced performance. This loss of power made the Menasco Moth a less than ideal pilot-training airplane and contributed to the Menasco Moth being used almost exclusively for radio training.'

    Season greetings:

    Robert

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    Default

    To add to Robert's information:

    The Menasco Moth was under-powered as a trainer, and very underpowered when a transmitter, reciever, and various antennae were added. During the summer at the higher altitude western Wireless Schools, flying with the Menasco Moths would end by noon on most days. This may be why the basically unsuitable Fleet Fort remained in production. It was bad, but it was better than a Menasco Moth. Eventually Harvards, and then Canadian built Ansons, would become standard at the wireless schools.

    There are some pictures of the radio fit at the Canada Air Museum web site. As you can see, it was a tight fit.
    http://www.aviation.technomuses.ca/collections/image_bank/dig_image.cfm?Lang=e&id=24198

    This photo shows the small DF loop fairing under the fuselage. There was also a small fairing under the rear seat for a hand-cranked trailing antenna.
    http://www.aviation.technomuses.ca/collections/image_bank/dig_image.cfm?Lang=e&id=29270

    Several Menasco Moths were converted to regular Moths after passing into civilian hands, but I'm not sure if any were converted while in service.

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