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Thread: Do Met men do Coastal/Tidal flows?

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    Default Do Met men do Coastal/Tidal flows?

    Hi all

    Maybe a strange heading but I wonder if anyone can tell me or point me at somewhere to find out how the sea flows around the German Bight area off NW Germany? Does it simply run along up or down the coast along the Frisian Islands or is it more complicated than that with back-flows or other 'funnies'?

    My title is because I don't know whether our Met colleagues dabble in this type of thing too?

    I ask because of a reference to a shot-down airman, and (maybe?) the i/d of the relevant night fighter.

    Thanks as always

    Ian

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    Hi Ian

    You can get tide info from the Hydrographic Dept, you can even search for the tides etc back in time using the easytide site. A chart of the area will also have tidal diamonds which help you plot the tides for a given area. hth

    Kevin

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    Not this metman Ian, but Peter might know something as he used to work in the North Sea (rumour has it they were trying to get rid of him.)

    Brian

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    No, not me either! Wind-waves and swell was all I had to do with the 'Oggin. Tides (upness, down-ness, which way and how fast), as far as I was aware, were strictly the prerogative of the R Navy. Even the Met Office Storm Tide Warning Service was originally staffed by retired Naval Officers (don't know what happens now). The Hydrographer ("Droggy" to his friends) will know all!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Thanks chaps, a few things there to follow-up along with a few other bits off the internet as well.

    I guess that 'tides' (the 'up-and-downy-bits') aren't really what I meant after all, so sorry if my original title was a bit misleading there, but instead it's the currents and circulation of this area of sea that I think I need to look at.

    If not to provide a definitive "Yes" it might at least instead give me a definite "No" by ruling out the possibility that if an a/c came down at "X", the bodies of two of the crew could have arrived at "Y" or "Z" a certain number of weeks later. If the flow of the currents mean that would have been impossible that'll rule out one question I had over the possible identity of a NJ claim victim.

    Thanks again

    Ian

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    Hi Ian but that is what tide does? the currents are the tide. You can work out the drift from the chart but remember it will turn every 6.5 hours and your plot will have to take that into account plus the wind direction will have some influence on a floating object. If you get a chart of the area it will be easy to work out set and drift.

    Kevin

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    The answer is no, MET men don't do analyses of coastal currents and flow. This falls in the domain of physical oceanographers. The analysis is quite complicated: wind induced currents vary with lattitude (coriolis forces) and wind direction etc. Currents vary with tidal flow (as has been pointed out) and also local rivers in coastal areas as well as temperature and salinity. Stratification of surface waters has a profound effect on model preditions. I've been looking at it to determine the response of fish to wind in Juan de Fuca Strait. Dr. R Thomson has developed models for this location...
    http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/sci/juandefuca/default_e.htm
    Note that one of the more famous physical oceanographers was the late G.L. Pickard, one of my undergraduate professors. S/L Pickard was a "boffin" with the RAF and is notable for those on this forum as it was he who develped the twin searchlights used on 617 lancasters during Chastise (Dams raid).

    Here's the text from Pickard's obituary: "With the onset of WW II George worked with Sir R.V. Jones, at the Clarendon Laboratory Oxford, on the first successful use of infrared radiation to detect aircraft at night. In 1938 he was posted to the Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnbourgh becoming Senior Scientific Officer and later Squadron Leader. George designed a simple two-spotlight beam altimeter to assist aircraft to fly at low altitudes for night attacks on submarines. He later applied this technique to Lancaster aircraft used for attacks on the Ruhr dams – a mission made famous in the book and movie “The Dam Busters”. Testing navigational aids required many flights over water and occupied Europe. In 1942 George qualified for membership in “The Goldfish Club” by surviving after his plane went down in the English Channel. In recognition of George’s contributions to the War effort, in 1946, he was decorated as a Member of the British Empire."
    Last edited by JDCAVE; 28th January 2009 at 01:04.

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