Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: 24 november 1941 death of clc P. Allard (Free French)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Dijon, France
    Posts
    459
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default 24 november 1941 death of clc P. Allard (Free French)

    Hi,

    According to the book “Aviateurs de la liberté”, on 24 november 1941, caporal-chef Philippe Allard is KIA during a training night flight aboard an aircraft of 5 SFS. A/c crashed near Cotton Hall Farm, Cranage.

    When you browse the ORB of 5 FTS this accident and death are not listed. Could it a an accident in an other Flying Training School ? Idea ?

    TIA

    Bertrand H

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    667
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi Bertrand,

    it should read 11 FTS:

    The entry from the ORB records:
    "Oxford II X6948. The pupil 30010 Cpl Allard P C (Free French), was flying solo at night. He had successfully completed a first circuit and landing, and crashed shortly after turning on to the 270 degree leg of his second circuit. He was killed instantly and the aircraft was totally wrecked but did not catch fire. An investigation was called for. The accident was reported by Signal T 724 from RAF Cranage.

    25/11 -
    Squadron Leader A D Forster DFC, of No 5 SFTS, this day began an investigation into the night flying accident at Cranage in which Cpl Allard was killed on the 24/11/41. Evidence was given by the officer in charge, F/Lt L D Birkett and other personnel who all vouched that both pilot and aircraft were fit for the flight in question. The weather was also good, and it appeared from the evidence that Cpl Allard made a normal take off, lost height during his first turn, and then lost sight of the flare path. It then appeared that he then turned steeply to port, losing so much height that the aircrafts port wing tip struck the ground, and it was then completely wrecked. The Investigating Officer had no recommendations to make, and considered the accident was due to an error of judgement by the pupil, who must have ignored his altimeter altogether, and became confused when he lost sight of the flare path.
    11 FTS were operating a detached flight from Shawbury at the time at Cranage.

    Cheers, Tom

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Dijon, France
    Posts
    459
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Many thanks Tom for this very detailed reply. I add these new infos in the book and I correct the unit !

    bertrand

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •