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Thread: wing commander vaughan bowerman corbett c 299

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    Default wing commander vaughan bowerman corbett c 299

    he was killed in a flying accident on the 20.02.45.
    aircraft serial and crew name if any would be most appreciated.
    thanks. t.s.

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    From: http://debertmilitarymuseum.org/RCAFcasualties.html

    CORBETT, Vaughan Bowerman - G/C (P) - C299 from Presqulle Point, Ontario, killed February 20, 1945 Age 33 #7 Operational Training Unit, Debert, Nova Scotia Bolingbroke aircraft #9179 crashed shortly after take-off, two miles west of Bagotville, Quebec. Sgt. J.A. Fisher, LAC W.R. Clark, and W. Warrell were also killed. G/C Corbett had been shot down and wounded during the Battle of Britain on August 31, 1940 with #1 RCAF Squadron. Group Captain Pilot Corbett is buried in the St James Cemetery, Toronto, Ontario

    A

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    Default Group Captain Corbett

    G'day Thomas

    The information from the Debert Military Museum website posted by Amrit was quoted from "They Shall Not Grow Old".

    Bristol Bolingbroke Mk. IVT s/n 9 was built by Fairchiled Aircraft at Longueuil, Quebec. It was a target-tug with with the R.C.A.F.'s No. 7 O.T.U. (previously R.A.F.'s No. 34 O.T.U. until redesignation on the 1st of July 1944).

    Pilot - C299 Group Captain V B Corbett DFC 'Killed'
    Passenger - 10194 Sergeant J A Fisher 'Killed'
    Passenger - R90589 Sergeant W R Clark 'Killed'
    Passenger - R117358 LAC W C Warrell 'Killed'
    Passenger - R106947 LAC L Gobell 'Seriously Injured'

    The accident occurred at 18:20 Hours Zulu.

    Group Captain Corbett was carrying out a transport flight when the accident took place.

    The A.I.B. laid the blame primarly on Group Captain Corbett, a pilot considered inexperienced on the Bolingbroke. Despite the starborad engine failure for some unexplained reason, it was felt that a successful single-engine landing could have been made if he had carried out proper single-engine procedures. They found Group Captain Corbett negligent for not carrying out prescribed prodcdures for testing and running up of the engines prior to take off. Additionally, he failed to sign the flight plan and maintenance form.

    Cheers...Chris

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    Default G/C Corbett

    Typo Alert -Typo Alert - Typo Alert!!!!

    "(previously R.A.F.'s No. 34 O.T.U. until redesignation on the 1st of July 1944)."

    No. 34 O.T.U. should in fact read No. 31 O.T.U. Sorry Jason )-:

    Now that I've clipped my finger nails, there should be no more typos for a while (-:

    Cheers...Chris

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    Default

    thank you both very much for the information.
    i apologise for the duplicate enquiery.
    regards. tom

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    Default Looking for Mrs. Vaughan Bowerman Corbett

    My name is Ruth Gabriel, I am 95 years old and Mary Catherine Sloan Corbett is my cousin. She is from Tulsa and married Mr. Corbett in 1939. Mary Catherine had four sisters. I cannot recall their married names and I'm having difficulty finding any of them. If any of you can tell me the wherabouts of Mary Catherine (she would be 90 years old) I will greatly appreciate it. I will be grateful for for ANY information you can offer.
    With thanks,
    Ruth Gabriel

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    Ruth
    Have you looked in the Canadian white pages ? It's highly likely that Mrs Mary V B Corbett remarried after the war or returned to Tulsa when widowed. There is a Mary Corbett in London, Ontario & many M Corbetts in the Ont .white pages .http://www.whitepages.com/white-pages/ON

    There are also Corbetts in the US White pages in Tulsa http://www.whitepages.com/
    maybe relatives ?

    Otherwise a search letter "trying to make contact with my cousin etc" to a Toronto or other Ontario towns' newspapers or a Tulsa, Oklahoma newspaper ?
    http://www.thepaperboy.com/city1.cfm?PaperCity=Tulsa

    Hopefully someone can help.

    Anne
    Last edited by aestorm; 29th August 2009 at 20:55.

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    Default Vaughn Corbett was my uncle

    It gave me quite a stir to read this thread as Group Captain Corbett was Uncle Vaughn to me. The night of the day he died was was one of my first vivid memories at age 5. There was such emotional turmoil in our apartment as my parents dealt with the news, I still remember the great sense of loss even though I didn't fully understand it then.

    I realize the thread's a couple of years old so no one may revisit it but in case...

    Ruth, Mary Catherine died of cancer in Washington D.C. uncertain of the date but I'm guessing around 1980. She was survived by her husband Ray Courtney also from Tulsa whom she married around 1960. She was a genuinely lovely person and was deeply missed. Ray was in the diplomatic corp and once served as the U.S. Consul General in Vancouver B.C.

    I had always heard that Vaughn was not the pilot on that fatal flight but I have no source for that other than family lore. My grandmother, Vaughn's mother, spent many hours telling me about Vaughn and the family history when I was in my early teens. Although I was fascinated with Vaughn's story I, unfortunately, didn't pay much attention to the rest of the rich history she spun. I do recall listening to a recording Vaughn made in his Hurricane (wire recorder) as they made a low--level bombing run over France. It was genuinely exciting. Vaughn was the Squadron Leader who pioneered the technique. (So I understand.)

    My father was an artillery officer who served overseas for 5 years; my uncle Casey Corbett was captured in Italy and spent 3 years in a POW camp. Another uncle was wounded in Sicily and died several years later from complications as a result. We were a family that paid a price for that war although no more than many others.

    Thank you for inquiring about Vaughn. I hope this information is interesting to you as well.

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