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Thread: Sgt Ralph Vincent Hogg 754794

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    Default Sgt Ralph Vincent Hogg 754794

    This 41S airman is recorded as 'missing' (MotBoB, CWGC) yet in Battle of Britain, the Forgotten Months it is stated that the wreckage of Spitfire P7326, complete with the pilot's body, was subsequently found; with no more detail than that.
    Does anyone know any more please, Steve Brew?

    regards

    DaveW

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    Also look out for Steve's answer. In my files no location and airman still on the Runnymede.
    Regards,
    Henk.

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    Hi Dave,
    Ralph Hogg was one of the pilots I covered in my book. I have read this report before same source as you. However, its false to say the least. I was in touch with Ralph's sister, now deceased, the correspondence from the family stated that 'Ralph 'Disappeared' while on patrol acting as scout to the squadron'...letter to the family from F/O A.D.J Lovel. His sister also stated that his body had never found and Ralph remains, as on CWGC, missing and his name is quite rightly on the Runnymede Memorial.
    His sister often visited the Channel Islands, noting the unknown airmen buied there, and stated: 'I often wondered if Ralph was one of those buried there.' I hope this is of some help.

    Best Wishes.
    Robert.

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    Robert

    thankyou, that seems conclusive.

    regards

    DaveW

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    Hi Dave

    Thanks Henk. As Robert says, Hogg is still missing.

    According to my research, Sgt. Plt. Ralph Hogg failed to return from a routine 12-aircraft patrol on 10 December 1940, which had departed Hornchurch at 15:35. Although visibility was generally poor, with varying amounts of cloud and a light westerly wind, there was no enemy action. There was no forewarning; Hogg just fell from the sky. He was flying Spitfire IIa, P7326, at the time.

    Rob alludes to a letter from his Flight Commander to his parents that told the story, which he has kindly shared with me, and I have also spoken with one of his cousins and his rigger, who was the last man to speak to Hogg on the ground.

    Having strapped him in on this particular flight, he recalls that they had not met before but immediately recognised each others’ Teesside accents. They vowed to talk more upon Hogg’s return, and remembers how ‘chuffed’ the young pilot was as he taxied away, looking forward to chatting after the patrol. The rigger was bitterly disappointed when Hogg failed to return and considering today what may have caused his ‘disappearance’, suggests oxygen supply was the most likely culprit.

    Although the exact reason for Hogg’s loss remains uncertain, a document in the files of RAF Hornchurch (Squadron Combats RAF Hornchurch, Essex, Nov 1939-Nov 1940, TNA AIR 16/856) adds an interesting piece of information, stating that an aircraft, believed to have been Hogg’s, was seen to crash in the Estuary six miles northeast of Warden Point. It is understood there were no other losses in the area that day. Despite the circumstantial evidence, however, the report cannot be verified. Hogg remains listed as ‘missing, presumed dead’ to this day.

    Weighing the available evidence, oxygen failure, resulting in unconsciousness, would appear to be the most likely scenario as, had another piece of equipment failed, Hogg would likely have radioed a mayday or in the least informed his Flight Commander he was in difficulty. In such case, he would have also baled out of a stricken aircraft, rather then consciously dive to the ground in silence.

    Hope this helps
    Steve
    41 (F) Squadron RAF at War and Peace, April 1916-March 1946
    http://brew.clients.ch/41sqnraf.htm

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    Thankyou Steve, I have put a note in my copy of MotBoB.

    regards

    DaveW

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