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Thread: W/C E C C Tomkins DFC (39910)

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    Default W/C E C C Tomkins DFC (39910)

    Could anybody provide details of the accident in which W/C E C C Tomkins, DFC, (39910) died on 17 October 1946 please? I believe it was the result of a mid-air collision, but I can find no record of it in The Times.

    Brian

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    Hi Brian
    If it is a collision, then "Broken Wings" by James Halley records such an incident on 17/10/46 1ml W of Sandridge, Hertfordshire. The a/c involved were Oxford T 1, RR336 of No12 MU and Tiger Moth T 2, T7615 of 1 EFTS. Without naming them he records 1 death on the Oxford and 2 on the Tiger Moth. If anyone has access to the ORBs they might confirm names.
    Regards
    Dick

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    Tomkins was in Oxford RR336 (12 MU), which collided with Tiger Moth T7615 (1EFTS), 1 mile west of Sandridge. Cummings, in Final Landings, states that the circumstances are not clear it would appear that there was inadequate lookout by both crews.

    No other casualties in the Oxford. The crew of the Moth were

    F/Lt Leslie Norman Empson
    Sub/Lt George Armstrong Greenwood RCNVR

    Both killed

    A

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    Dick/Amrit (info Lyffe)
    What was - one assumes - the "Station Hack" doing colliding with a Tiger Moth near to St Albans? 12 MU was at Kirkbride up in Darkest Cumbria, and (I think?) 1 EFTS was at Cranwell. Was the Oxford on the 1946 equivalent of a Lone Ranger? Did the Tiger Moth have Long Range Fuel Tanks?
    Something not quite right here. Can some of the Location Experts just check the above before it becomes enshrined in folklore!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Thank you gentlemen, with that information I've found a brief report of the accident in The Times.

    Always dangerous to make assumptions but the reference to 'an inadequate lookout' made me look at the weather charts. High pressure had dominated the weather for several days and I wouldn't mind betting the visibility was reduced by haze, which couldn't have made things easy.

    Brian

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