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Thread: Weather for 2/3 June 1944. Yorkshire to Paris

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    Default Weather for 2/3 June 1944. Yorkshire to Paris

    Hello met team,

    I'm looking into the weather conditions for the 4 Group operation to Trappes on 2/3 June 1944 Please could you tell me what it was like for the night of 2nd June 1944 for a flight from Yorkshire (Holme on Spalding Moor) to Trappes West of Paris. Zero hour was 0050 on 3rd June and the aircraft flew through the target at 27 aircraft per minute. The first take off by 76 Sqn was 22.17 and the route was Goole-Basingstoke-Pevensey Bay-Channel-Frecamp-Saint-Andre-de-l'Eure-TARGET Trappes-Saint-Remy-les-Chevreuse-Longvilliers-Brezolles-Elbeu-Frecamp-Channel-Pevensey Bay-Basingstoke-Holme on Spalding Moor. I have this nagging feeling I have asked the same question before but darned if I can find any record in the archives. I only know from my late father that weather over target was clear. Could you also tell me what the Moon was up to Thank you met team.

    Norman

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    Norman,

    Someone must have asked the question previously as I have the charts. The moon was 80% full and rose at 1511 GMT, transired at 2100 GMT and set at 0230 GMT on the 3rd.

    Backcasting I'd estimate that for the most part there was around 1/2 cover over the UK between 2500 and 6000 ft; patchy cloud above that, but increasing in amount from the west (especially in the north). Probably very little cloud over north France. Good visibility throughout.

    Freezing level 8000 ft.

    Winds at 10000 ft - NW 30 knots (35 mph); 14000 ft - NW 35 knots (40 mph).

    Brian
    (PS. I remember the thread as well, but darned if I can find it. If someone does - please don't compare my two hindcasts, it would be embarassing if they differ!
    Last edited by Lyffe; 30th April 2009 at 13:24. Reason: PS added

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    Thank you very much Brian, thats exactly what I require.
    Norman

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    Default message for the honourable met team

    Hello Lyffe.
    Regarding the moon on 2 June 1944 at 80% full rising 15:11 GMT, transiring at 21:00 GMT and setting at 02:30 GMT on the 3 June 1944. Where would it be in the sky when our aircraft were heading West at 01:00 GMT on the 3rd. Is this possible to calculate? I am trying to calculate what the conditions were at the moment my fathers aircraft was hit at 01:01 GMT over Longvilliers (south pf Trappes) from underneath by a nightfighter coming in from the East (Colombieres) and intercepting them while they were turning West for the coast. After blowing up my fathers aircraft the enemy fighter continued West destroying two more RAF bombers. Thank you
    Norman
    Last edited by namrondooh; 1st May 2009 at 18:56. Reason: adding more info

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    Norman,
    Best I can do is from http://aa.usno.navy.mil/cgi-bin/aa_altazw.pl.
    This gives the azimuth of 244 degs and an elevation of 13 degs. A rough check (on FSX) from Villacoubly r/w 27 shows the moon at about the right elevation, and one's 10 o'clock (but I'm having trouble with FSX in that it doesn't like local time being 2 hrs ahead of GMT!!)
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Hello Peter,
    Thank you very much for your help with my inquiry, it was most appreciated. Could I just check that "10 o/c" is in reference to the aircrafts westerly heading that is to say 12 o/c is west? or is it that 12 o/c is N ? (namrondoohs pea brain is bruised!)
    Last edited by namrondooh; 2nd May 2009 at 18:12.

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    Norman,
    I always understood that 12 o'clock was the front of an imaginary line through the centre-line of the a/c - whichever way the a/c was actually pointing. Thus 12 o'clock was dead ahead and 9 o'clock was 90 degs to the left (or port).
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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