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Thread: log book stolen at the end of the war

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    Default log book stolen at the end of the war

    Hello,

    During my research on airmen of Bomber Command I met several veterans who told me that their logbook were stolen at the end of the war no many time before to be released to civilian life , very often in their room on the base.
    I can understand that a logbook can be steal today for its value, but just after the war ??
    One veteran said it was stolen by non flying personnal, just to have it and to show that they did the war in the air ...
    Did you hear of this already ??
    Alain

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    Alain
    I have been told, first hand , of items belonging to missing or killed airmen being stolen from their tents at the Celone, Foggia, base in Italy , before they could be packed up to be sent home .

    Two man were caught doing this by an airman's " next tent " neighbour .

    So it's feasible that log books could be stolen, for their value, or as a souvenir or to pass off as one's own ?

    Anne
    Last edited by aestorm; 17th May 2009 at 14:24.

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    hello,

    I've found in Casualty files (also in Service files) purchased from the National Archives of Australia that some personel belongings went missing, after airmen had been officially posted "missing in action, presumed killed", or "killed in action". The families were already much distressed by the loss of their loved one, and this added to the pain. This may include for example cameras, pictures, clothes. In some case, these items were listed when the parcel left the central repository depot, but were missing when it arrived in the family's custody. So it's difficult to say when these items were stolen. That was back in 1944 and 1945 for the examples I've studied.

    Never heard personnally the story of stolen log-books by ground-crews.

    Joss

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    Hi Alain,

    A good friend of mine is the wife of John Harris Crisp DFM (97 sqdn). She told me that following his tour he was badly hurt in a car accident ending his flying career. On recovery he went back to collect his gear only to find both his logbook and Irvine flying jacket were missing. At the time he was most concerned about the flying jacket, she can understand why the jacket was taken but not the log.

    Following the war John never talked about his flying career and Alys is now trying to piece it together, his logbook would have filled in many gaps.

    Russ

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    I, too do not have my MIA RAAF father's log book which would have been a comfort to me to own ,plus a great help in research .
    It's not listed in his possessions, which were sent back to my mother in Sydney after the war.She can't remember if she did eventually receive it.

    I've tried all the official departments in UK & Australia & now accept that it is not going to "surface " anywhere.

    Anne

  6. #6
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    Default log book stolen at the end of the war

    hi all
    my uncles log book was stolen when he was in india in 1946 (RAF Vizagapatam}
    by a local
    les was not pleased but contacted his wartime pilot
    who sent him a copy of his log book
    see www.fiskertonairfield.org.uk
    the pilots log is crews 1 pilot Bill Holmes
    i cant see what use the log book was to the local
    odds on he was illiterate
    ill bet he burnt it cooking his curry
    dave

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    While I don't understand why someone would steal a logbook it is possible that other personal items may not have been stolen at all. According to my father, a pathfinder pilot, it was quite usual to make "deals" with other airmen, prior to an operation, with respect to dispersal of your belongings should you get the "chop". An example would be "hey Bill, I really like that flying jacket. "Okay Jack, if I get the "chop" it's yours. The next morning, those that survived would turn up to collect their treasures. As Dad said, "it sounds very cold, but we were young and our attitude was if someone wants it and I no longer need it, take it away."

    Leslie

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    I do not know of log books stolen, apart of those by collectors, but I know that a number of airmen claimed they have lost theirs, in order not to show them to researchers. I have no idea of reasoning. Otherwise, as far as I know, they were considered AM property and not returned unless requested by families.

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    Hi
    I only came across three cases,
    one a person I talked to was loaned some books and was on leave, when the owner went missing on ops, on his return he was posted and didn't manage to get the borrowed items returned.
    another similar he was posted rapidly, his belongings to follow, in it was an item he had borrowed, unable to return it.
    another a pilot had a bad crash was in hospital, arrived back at the SQ, all his stuff had gone and he was then posted to another SQ, but the items were not there when he arrived.
    I personally can see how in the hectic times, things got 'lost'
    cheers
    Jerry

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    Just out of interest, we are all assuming that Log books were a possession of the person concerned was it not the case that the logbook belonged to the Air Ministry. Are we all sure that it could be kept after the person left the RAF? Maybe saying that it had "gone missing" was the way these logbooks survived. Or am I talking rubbish?
    An American airman, was told at Briefing to ‘Go in at 30,000 feet and keep out of the flak.”
    “If I go in a 20,000 feet, what will happen?’ asked the airman.
    “You’ll probably be mentioned in despatches”, answered the officer.
    “If I go in at 10,000 feet ?“ he asked.
    “In that case you will probably get the Congress Medal”, he was told.
    "And if I go in at 5,000 feet?’ he inquired excitedly.
    “Don’t be a fool, man”, replied his superior, “you’ll go and bump into the R.A.F. at that height.”

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