Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: Coastal Command - S.E. Flooding patrol?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Northumberland
    Posts
    355
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Coastal Command - S.E. Flooding patrol?

    Hi All,

    Could anyone explain what an 'S. E. Flooding patrol' was? I think it may have something to do with ASV radar but I am really just guessing.

    Just to put this in context, the log entry reads: A/S Patrol.... 'S. E. Flooding patrol - Bay of Biscay. 5 hours in patrol area'.

    Many thanks in advance,

    Russ

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,546
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 15 Times in 14 Posts

    Default

    Hi Russ,

    just a guess - I understand this as something like "sweep", i. e. to clean the Bay of Biscay area of any enemy or unknown ships.

    Maybe the date will help us t put it into context.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Northumberland
    Posts
    355
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Thanks Pavel,

    The date of this particular a/s patrol was 27th January 1943.

    On 18th February however, the Sunderland was 'brought up the slip for s.e. modifiactions' which makes me think it was some sort of radar.

    Russ

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,546
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 15 Times in 14 Posts

    Default

    If you mean the S.E. = Secret Equipment yes it was the official ID for ASV/ASG radars for security reasons. For example Czech radar operator of 311 Sq were trained in summer 1943 at No. 2 S. E. Training Section in Beaulieu.
    So they were doing training flights like „S.E. Excercise“ noted in the log book. This abbreviation is also mentioned on the first page with qualifications - S.E. (A.S.G.) Operator.

    Hope this helps a little.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    925
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts

    Default

    Russ and Pavel:
    I have seen the term 'Special Equipment' used to explain the abbreviation S.E. in the context of ASV radar.
    Best regards:
    Robert

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Berkshire
    Posts
    2,210
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi Russ
    As a follow up it is possible that "flooding" meant literally that. The Germans developed receivers that could pick up and give bearings on our radar transmissions and could avoid our a/c at the expense of submerging. They continued to do so as we gradually changed the frequencies going from metric to centimetric wavelengths. they followed us up to 10 cms but I believe that 3 cms eluded them.The thing was that they had to submerge and this drained battery power but ,more importantly, slowed the boats down to about 3kts. This could be used against them tactically by flooding an area with radar transmissions and keeping the Germans slowed whilst,hopefully, a convoy was routed out of range.Eventually they used the tactic of transiting in groups, accepting the probability of detection but armed with heavier anti-aircraft firepower to fight back when found. All part of the cat and mouse game that was the Battle of the Atlantic through the war.Your date of Jan 43 is in the metric or early 10cm wavelength for radar I would guess and of course if it was early 10cm there was a chance that the Germans couldn't pick it up at the time and would rely on their older receiver which misled them into believing they weren't being detected at all. It is recorded in the literature that they worked out the change of equipment from the increased number of attacks on U-Boats and started the search for new frequency. They could also have gained a clue if they got their hands on an early H2S set from a crashed Bomber Command a/c, which equipment was always in the centrimetric band.
    Regards
    Dick

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,011
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by robstitt View Post
    Russ and Pavel:
    I have seen the term 'Special Equipment' used to explain the abbreviation S.E. in the context of ASV radar.
    Best regards:
    Robert
    Ditto, also this phrase was in use in FAA training/operational squadrons.

    Regards,
    Bruce

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,011
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts

    Default

    Saw the posting from Dick after I posted my earlier comment, and I can confirm that the Admiralty began experimenting in 1942 with different ways of overwhelming the ASV detecting equipment of U-boats and coastal stations and that this was called 'flooding'. Sorry I have no details of which aircraft were equipped, but almost certainly four engined heavies would be needed.

    Bruce

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,546
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 15 Times in 14 Posts

    Default

    Hi all,

    yes I saw both 'Special Equipment' and 'Secret Equipment' and I choose for myself the second one:-) so I am sorry for little mystification.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Northumberland
    Posts
    355
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Many thanks to all of you who have helped to answer this.

    ASV etc I have come across but never the term 'flooding'!

    Oddly enough I have come across a log to a ferry w/op who qualified as an 'S.E. Operator (Coastal), again in January 1943; the qualification being credited to No. 3 RDS at Prestwich. Part of his training however was at No. 11 Radio Direction Finding School at Hooton Park, Cheshire. His duty here was 'S.I Coastal' (not E) and the remarks are ASV exercise Homing, ASV Beam search and just ASV exercises. No attempt was made to code 'ASV'.

    Finally, I don't know if I am right in thinking that to qualify as an S.E Operator, your gradings had to be high or even exeptional?

    Thanks again,

    Russ

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •