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Thread: Bomb load reference

  1. #1
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    Default Bomb load reference

    Hello,

    4 X 500 GP LD37.
    The above is a reference to a bomb load. I am wondering what GP & LD37 might refer to.
    Has anyone got an answer?

    Thanks in advance for your help,
    Dirk

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    Dirk.

    I believe the GP stands for general purpose. As for the other part of your query I would be most interested in an answer too as an ORB I am currently reading has many references to 37 pistols which I presume is some kind of fuse or firing mechanism but I have seen references to 37A, 37B, 37D and 37E so far, and a reference to ANM's?

    Any help appreciated.

    regards,

    Kevin Mears

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    Default Bombs

    Hi Dirk

    I think that GP does indeed mean General Purpose ie 'normal' bombs as opposed to incendiaries, blast bombs ('cookies'), or other types, while LD might be 'Long Delay' (ie delayed-action detonation). 37 = 37 hours? 37 minutes? Not sure.

    Others may know for sure.

    Ian

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    LD = Long Delay

    Hope this helps,

    Bruce

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    Thanks for your help gentlemen,

    I just found an answer to my question on the following interesting website: http://www.hnsa.org/doc/britord/bomb/index.htm#toc

    http://www.hnsa.org/doc/britord/bomb/cat-0241.htm

    37 refers to 'British tail pistol No. 37' used in the British 500 lb General Purpose bomb.
    Functioning : Chemical Long delay 6 to 144 hours.

    Thanks,
    Dirk

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    Kevin,

    Delays intended for this pistol are indicated by a letter after the number :

    No. 37 = 6 hours
    No. 37A = 12 hours
    No. 37B = 36 hours
    No. 37D = 72 hours
    No. 37E = 144 hours

    Dirk

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    Dirk.

    That's fantastic.

    Thank you very much for that.

    Regards,

    Kevin Mears

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    Kevin,
    "ANM" with reference to bomb types indicates American-sourced bombs, as in "Army/Navy" (the "AN" bit), then "M" for the specific type of bomb (which, strictly speaking, should be followed by a dash, then a series number, as there were very many types of American bombs. Generally the RAF used the more common types of American bombs (500 pound, 1,000 pound, etc, to make up for the shortage of standard British-manufactured bombs late in the war (mostly after D-Day), when the RAF's ability to deliver bombs in great quantities to enemy targets in Europe far exceeded British bomb production ability to manufacture that quantity, thus the recourse to obtaining similar (equivalent) bombs from the friendly Americans! One often sees the expression "ANM" in detailed lists of bomb loads carried by Bomber Command aircraft in the later stages of the war, and they sometimes give the exact type of the American bombs, other times just "ANM".
    David D

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