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Thread: Father in Law Dyer

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    Default Father in Law Dyer

    I'm looking for data about my father in law (like his service number)
    His name was Raymond Herbert Harvey Dyer. He was a navigator most likely for the Path Finder Force presumably the 35 Squadron. He didn't share much about his service life, from what I know he served from 1940/41-1945 and was assigned to demobilization activities directly after the war. Apparently he was taken down twice, once he made it back and shortly before the end of the war he became a POW somewhere in east Germany. He escaped in the chaos of the advancing Red Army

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    Hi Theo, his service number was 154634 and you will find his dates of promotion searching the London Gazette:

    http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/search

    Hope that's a start for you.

    Cheers, Tom

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    Default R H H Dyer

    Thanks Tom

    This is very helpful to our research.

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    Theo.

    I hope you find this useful. Two extracts from the 1941 and 1945 volumes of Bomber Command Losses books by W R Chorley.

    28/29 September 1941.

    99 Squadron. Wellington Ic X9761 LN- Op: Frankfurt.

    Took off 1914 Waterbeach. (It seems nothing further was heard from them.)

    Crew:

    Sgt. E Coleman. PoW.
    Sgt. L Birk. Evaded.
    SGT. J L Trask. PoW.
    F/S H G Lewis. PoW.
    Sgt. R Dyer. Evaded.
    Sgt. J Dicks. Evaded.

    14/15 April 1945.

    35 Squadron. Lancaster III PB377 TL-K. Op: Potsdam.

    Took off 1840 Graveley. In the vicinity of the target an engine caught fire and, as ordered, the crew commenced bailing out. With six departed, and preparing to make his own exit, F/O Bowen-Morris regained control and was able to reach Dutch air space before, at last, being obligated to take to his parachute.

    F/O V B Bowen-Morris.
    Sgt. W G Reynolds. Killed. Body never recovered.
    F/O R H H Dyers. PoW.
    F/S E G Silcock. PoW.
    F/S C S Gibbon. PoW.
    F/S J W Tovey. Evaded.
    F/S E G Meredith DFM. PoW.

    I know there is a misspelling of Dyer as Dyers but the initials and the 35 Squadron link make me pretty sure this is your man.

    Regards,

    Kevin Mears.

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    Hi,
    Bit of a mystery here, Chorley has for the 99sqdn 28/29 Sept 1941 operation, Sgt L.Birk, evaded, while RAF Evaders (Clutton-Brock) has 99sqdn, Sgt H.E.Birk, RAAF, evaded, if it was the latter, he was later kia with 159sqdn in the Middle East

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    Hello Theo,Tom,Kevin & Alan,

    Afraid Bill Chorley's crew details for No.99 Sqn Wellington IC X9761, lost 28/29-9-41 (BCL2/153), needs a substantial re-write. (This is not it - still working on it)

    Revised crew detail:-

    954634 Sgt (Pilot) E COLEMAN POW
    AUS402634 Sgt (2nd Pilot) Hilary Eldred BIRK RAAF Evaded
    973459 Sgt J L TRASK POW
    573247 F/Sgt H G LEWIS POW
    1381730 Sgt W H DYER Evaded
    CAN R/65466 Sgt J B DICKS RCAF Evaded

    (Subject to review)

    Hence, 1381730 'W H' Dyer, and 1621747/154634 'R H H' Dyer, not the same man.

    Col
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 2nd August 2009 at 04:12. Reason: minor correction

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    Hi Theo,

    According to the Air Force List October 1945 :-

    154634 R.H.H Dyer promoted Flying Officer 10/6/1944 listed under Navigators (which means he could of been a navigator or a bomb aimer)

    Mark

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    My apologies for any confusion I have caused.

    Regards,

    Kevin Mears

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    From Oliver Clutton-Brock's "Footprints on the Sands of Time":

    F/O RHH Dyers (spelled with an "s") is listed as being on a 35 Sqn Lancaster (PB377) sortie to Potsdam on 14/4/1945. No camp listed but hardly surprising as the German POW camp reporting system had broken down by 15 March 1945.

    I would be interested to know which camp he was in as Potsdam is a suburb of Berlin.

    Regards,

    Dave
    Last edited by alieneyes; 2nd August 2009 at 06:10.

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    From Clutton-Brock’s RAF Evaders:


    “Flying to Potsdam, on the night of 14/15 April 1945, on the last of RAF Bomber Command’s mainforce raids of the war, one of Lancaster PB377’s engines caught fire. Ordering the crew to bale out, F/O U B Bowen-Morris, waited until the other six of his crew had jumped, and was preparing to go himself when he regained control of the bomber. He managed to fly it back, alone, to friendly territory over Holland before taking to his parachute. Of the six who had baled out near Potsdam, south west of Berlin, four were captured, one was killed and one, F/S J W Tovey, evaded capture. After two days of waling westwards on his own Tovey ran into a party of French prisoners of war. Disclosing his identity to one of the Frenchmen, he was taken ‘to the British man of confidence at a camp at Schiameirtz’.

    Changing into army battledress he stayed in the camp. ‘The Germans did not notice me, as there was no organisation in the camp. After four days I walked out with two soldiers and continued south until we joined with the American First Army at Grimma five or six days later’. Grimma, not far to the north-west of Coldtiz, was well over 100 kilometres from Schiameirtz, and it was some feat to walk such a long way in an area infested with German troops. Perhaps Tovey deserved to get away with it, after all not many free men voluntarily admitted themselves to prisoner of war camp.” (pg 323-324)

    A

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