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Thread: Unknown pilot

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    Default Unknown pilot

    I've heard today a story about fighter pilot who was in 58 OTU in Grangemouth in 1941 (probably July and August). His name suppose to be Glazebrook or Glacebrook (?). Another part of this story is about him being shot down (don't know when). He evaded and was seen in France late June, July or August 1944.
    Does anyone know anything about this pilot? Is his name correct?

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    Default Glacebrook or Glazebrook

    Hi Peter

    I have looked through the list of evaders in "RAF Evaders - the comprehensive story of thousands of escapers and their escape lines, western europe, 1940 - 1945" by Oliver Clutton-Brock and your man does not feature with either spelling.

    cheers

    Allan
    Allan Hillman

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    Default Unknown pilot

    The pilot noted below was at No.58 OTU about the dates you mentioned, but as he was killed 31 October 1942, nothing else in his story fits the narrative you have.

    GLAZEBROOK, F/L Edwin Herbert (J5329) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.229 Squadron - Award effective 22 October 1942 as per London Gazette dated 3 November 1942 and AFRO 1962/42 dated 4 December 1942. Born in Outremont, Quebec, 18 August 1918. Educated at Alfred Joyce School, Montreal, 1924-1931 and Strathcona Academy, 1931-1935. Took Accounting and Business courses at Sir George Williams College, 1935-1936. Also took correspondence banking courses from Shaw Schools, Toronto. Employed as an office worker for T. Eaton Company for two months (1934); teller for Royal Bank of Canada in Montreal, 1935-1940. Enlisted in Montreal, 7 October 1940 and posted that date to No.2 Manning Depot, Brandon. To Vancouver, 24 October 1940. To No.2 ITS, 28 November 1940; graduated and promoted LAC, 2 January 1941; posted that date to No.12 EFTS; Goderich, graduated 24 February 1941 when posted to No.1A Manning Depot, Picton; to No.1 SFTS, Camp Borden, 5 March 1941; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 16 May 1941. Commissioned with effect from 17 May 1941 as per Appointments, Promotions and Retirements dated 28 May 1941 and Canada Gazette of 21 Junr 1941. . To Embarkation Depot, 17 May 1941; to RAF overseas, 19 June 1941. To No.58 OTU, 14 July 1941. To No.130 Squadron, 25 August 1941, serving there until at least 13 April 1942 (see assessment below). Promoted Flying Officer, 17 May 1942; Served in Malta, arriving there via carrier HMS Eagle on 18 May 1942. To No.603 Squadron, 18 May 1942. To No.229 Squadron, 5 August 1942. Victories as mentioned in Chris Shores, Malta: The Spitfire Year were: 6 June 1942, one Ju.88 damaged; 1 July 1942, one MC.202 damaged; 2 July 1942, one Bf.109 destroyed (BR, 365, shared with another pilot); 8 July 1942, two Ju.88s damaged; 25 July 1942, one MC.202 destroyed; 11 October 1942, one MC.202 destroyed plus one Ju.88 probably destroyed plus one Ju.88 damaged (three separate sorties); 12 October 1942, one Ju.88 destroyed; 14 October 1942, one Ju.88 damaged (shared with another pilot); 15 October 1942, one Ju.88 damaged. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 30 August 1942. Killed in flying accident, (Liberator crash at Gibraltar), 31 October 1942.

    "This officer has participated in many sorties over Sicily. In the heavy fighting over Malta he has taken part in many interceptions and his flight has destroyed twelve enemy aircraft. By his skilful and courageous leadership Flight Lieutenant Glazebrook played a large part in the successes obtained. He has destroyed three enemy aircraft."

    Training: Interviewed for RCAF on 1 August 1940 by F/O Maurice Janin (later Mentioned in Despatches) who described him as "Very good type, near and clean and very smart for height, intelligent and quick, organized, polite, courteous, good lad, should be well liked." The reference to height is unusual - Glazebrook was five feet six inches tall and weighed 130 pounds.

    Course at No.2 ITS was from 29 November to 23 December 1940. Courses and marks as follows: Mathematics (75/100), Armament, P and O (81/100), Visual Link Trainer (B), Drill (63/100), Law and Discipline (84/100). Placed 30th in a class of 201. Described as follows: "Very good type and material. Mature - self confident. Above classroom average."

    Course at No.12 EFTS was from 4 January to 21 February 1941. Att flying on Finch I and Finch II aircraft - 25 hours dual, 25 hours 15 minutes solo, and fine hours in Link Trainer. Described by instructor as "A pilot suitable for either single or twin-engined aircraft. His aerobatics are fair. Instrument flying and general flying above average." Ground school courses and marks as follows: Airmanship (176/200), Airframes (147/200), Aero Engines (166/200), Signals, Practical (47//50), Theory o f Flight (80/100)), Air Navigation (176/200), Armament, Oral (160/200). Qualities as an Officer (175/200). Placed first in a class of 31. Deemed suitable for commissioned rank. Described as follows: "An above average student both in flying and Ground Work. Studious and conscientious. Recommended for commission."

    Course at No.1 SFTS was 5 March to 16 May 1941. Flew Yale and Harvard aircraft; 45 hours 50 minutes day dual, 37 hours 15 minutes day solo, five hours 55 minutes night dual, four hours 20 minutes night solo. These included 20 hours on instruments. Also logged 15 hours in Link and 140 minutes as a passenger. General flying assesses as "Above average", Formation flying as "Average", Navigational Ability as "Average". And Instrument Flying as "Above Average". Described by Squadron Commander (S/L G.V. Priestly ?) as "Progress very satisfactory to a high average; pupil alert and very quick to learn." He was actually recommended for "General Reconnaissance" work. Ground courses and marks as follows: Airmanship and Maintenance (150/200), Armament-W (77/100), Armament (91/100), Navigation and Meteorology (166/200), Signals-W (91/100), Signals-P (50/50). Chief Ground Instructor wrote, "Very satisfactory - obtained first place in class of 52 pupils. Good effort made all through."

    The list of graduates recommended for commissions following No.1 SFTS is headed by Glazebrook, followed by Sergeant C.S. White (killed in flying accident, United Kingdom, 26 September 1941), H.L. Myers, J.L.H. Eliott, C.A. King, R.A. Laing (killed in action, 12 January 1942), A.C. White (killed in action, 29 April 1942), G.G. Retallack (killed in action, 2 July 1942), L.H. Warriner (awarded AFC for Ferry Command services), S. Jamieson (killed in flying accident in Ceylon, 1 July 1942), A.T.A. Young, R.F. Minnick (killed in flying accident, No.58 OTU, 1 August 1941), H.A. Nicholson , J.R. Freeland (killed in action, 29 September 1941), F.J. Sherlock (awarded DFC), C.G.R. Saunders (killed in flying accident, 26 October 1941), A.R. Moulden, G.S. Robb (not commissioned, killed in action 14 July 1942), P.T.W. Walker (not commissioned, killed in action 22 October 1941), A.H.J. Fawcett (killed in flying accident, 16 September 1942), A.A. MacLeod (apparently not commissioned, killed in flying accident in Canada, 26 July 1943), J.A. Parker (not commissioned, killed in flying accident at No.55 OTU, 28 August 1941), F.R. Richardson (killed in action, 6 January 1942), S.H. Frankel and J.L. Roach (not commissioned, killed in action 11 August 1942).

    Course at No.58 OTU lasted 14 July to 25 August 1941. Flew on Masters (two hours 50 minutes dual, six hours 25 minutes solo) and Spitfires (36 hours ten minutes). This included three hours on instruments and 12 hours formation flying; also logged six hours 50 minutes in Link. Flying Aptitude was listed under several headings - Natural Aptitude (Average), Skill in Landing (Average), Airmanship (Average), Aerobatics and Dog Fight (Above Average), Cockpit Drill (Average), Instrument Flying (Average), Formation Flying (Above Average) and Air Firing (not assessed), Map Reading (Average). Under "Distinctive Qualities" the following Categories were Listed:

    1. Persistence (Does he keep on trying or is he easily discourage ?) - Above Average

    2. Sense of Responsibility (Has he common sense or is he over-confident ?) - Average

    3. Endurance (Does he put up a consistently satisfactory performance under conditions of strain ?) - Above Average.

    4. Leadership (Has he taken the lead in any activities ? Would he make a good captain of aircraft or Flight leader ?) - Above Average

    5. Method (Does he work systematically to a plan ?) - Above Average.

    6. Deliberation (Does he act decisively for reasons or on impulse ?) - Average

    7. Initiative (Does he want ro try things on his own ?) Above Average.

    8. Dash (Is he quick and decisive in action ?) - Average

    9. Distribution of Attention (Does he find it difficult to do more than one thing at a time ?) - Average

    10. Self Control (Does he get flustered ?) - Average

    11. General Assessment of .suitability as Operational Pilot - Above Average

    His overall assessment at No.58 OTU was as follows: "Pilot Officer Glazebrook is keen and conscientious and his ability as a fighter pilot is above the average run of pupils."

    Assessment: An assessment of him for No.130 Squadron for the period 25 August 1941 to 13 April 1942 described him as "A very bright and keen young pilot who should do well in a fighter squadron."

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    Default

    Hugh

    Many thanks for all your info. Honestly I didn't expect that much. The person who told me that mysterious story was in 58 OTU in that time. That would explain why he knew Glazebrook. Maybe he knew him well and that's why he still has this name in mind. It is also possible that he met another -different mate from Grangemouth in 1944, but now - after 64 years he mismatched this person name.
    Perhaps another pilot who was in 58 OTU in 1941 with him?

    Thanks a lot.

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    Default 58 Otu

    Hugh, not wishing to hijack this thread but would you have any information on another pilot who was at 58 OTU, in June 1943 ...... Sgt T. Hetherington number 1239658 ?

    Dave B

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