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Thread: Humour in Station Operational Record books.

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    Default Humour in Station Operational Record books.

    I found this entry in RAF Hunsdons ORB for the night of the 12/13th August 1944.

    'Flt/Lt Pine-Coffin of Headquarters Central Command ATC, visited the Station'.

    Are entries like this fairly well recorded in these official documents?



    http://i394.photobucket.com/albums/pp24/airfieldimages/HSORB66.jpg

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    The better writers of ORBs, F540, F541, etc, can weave all sorts of tales! Us lesser mortals - having been engaged on the same task - could only try to make humour out of prosaic events, and not very successfully!!!!
    Incidentally, there are 136 entries for the name Pine-Coffin in the LG!!!
    HTH (but I doubt it!!)
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    There was I believe a Lt Col Pine-Coffin DSO and Bar, MC who served as Co of 7th Battalion The Parachute Regiment during the war. His soldiers used to call him "wooden box".

    Regards

    Daz

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    Going back to humour in official documents; this description from an Escape and Evasion report never fails to make me laugh, for some reason:-

    "I was the only P/W in an Italian bus containing five soldiers, a lot of French cheeses and
    a large Alsatian dog."

    It sounds like a scene out of 'Allo 'Allo - all it needs is a knockwurst and a funny painting...

    Jeff

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    From The 101 Squadron ORB:
    Christmas Day, 1942: "The Squadron enjoyed a stand-down today, the weather was foul, fog, and as a result, heads were also thick the next day"
    Dec.26/42: "Fog again prevented flying today and the Squadron was able to recuperate quietly."

    15.6.43 " We move to Ludford Magna....The incorrigibles of course, operated the first night. A very low level attack was staged on Louth. The Mason's Arms being the target."
    Regards
    Dave Wallace

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    So it may seem that Flt/Lt Pine-Coffin may well have been a bona fide RAF Officer....
    But keep the real humourous tales coming!

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    On the night of 17-18 August 1943, during an attack on Lincoln, a 604 Sqn Beaufighter crew claimed a Do 217 destroyed, and another probably destroyed. The port engine failed on approach to Scorton and the aircraft crashed. The pilot, who was seriously injured, was a F/Sgt WILKINSON. Their call-sign ? RAZOR 24 !

    BC

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    The compiler of RAF Atcham's ORB certainly seems to have enjoyed writing his entries. Here are a couple of my favourites:

    24th January 1942 (a full scale investigation was begun on the 3rd September after a local farmer complained about his cow injuring itself on the barbed wire defence):
    "The investigation into the cow with the crumpled teat is complete and the AOC agrees with the findings which are to the effect that while it is only too clear that the unfortunate animal did lacerate itself on barbed wire, there is nothing (such as the LDC's finger prints or fragments of his apparel) to show whether it was our defence wiring that the damage was done. Unfortunately one quarter of the cow's milking apparatus will forever be lost to the nation".

    1st September 1942:
    “At 2331 an aircraft of 96 Sqn scrambled as there was a Hun near York who later turned east and did not come into range. At 2347 a mouse entered the ops room from the south. He maintained a steady course of 010’ (Mag) WAAF personnel remained calm and did not scramble”.

    There's many more too!

    Cheers, Tom

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    Quote Originally Posted by thorne83 View Post
    At 2347 a mouse entered the ops room from the south. He maintained a steady course of 010’ (Mag) WAAF personnel remained calm and did not scramble”.
    Oh that's very good. Have come across many similar examples but can't think of any off hand as usual.

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    Guys,

    One quote found whilst researching basic training.

    Also on 28th February it was reported that ‘A Spitfire from 6 M.U. made a circuit of the aerodrome complete with an airman as passenger who, through no wish of his own, remained on the tail. The Spitfire landed safely and the journey was completed without mishap’.

    Regards,

    Nick

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