Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: F/O Roderick Maton Mackenzie (Aus. 413242)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    296
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default F/O Roderick Maton Mackenzie (Aus. 413242)

    Hi
    Can anyone tell me what the "harrassing circumstances" were that earned Mackenzie the Most Excellent Order of the- British Empire:
    I think he was with 168 squadron
    The London Gazette reports....
    28th April, 1944.
    To be an Additional Member of the Military Division of the said Most Excellent Order: —
    Flying Officer Roderick Maton Mackenzie (Aus. 413242), Royal Australian Air Force.
    In very, harassing circumstances Flying Officer Mackenzie displayed great determination, courage and devotion to duty.

    Cheers Motherbird

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Val. Mezirici, Czech Republic
    Posts
    846
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 15 Times in 14 Posts

    Default

    Hi,
    I think that the "harrassing circumstances" was his way back to Great Britain probably via Spain.
    His Mustang FD489 was shot down over Essertaux (S of Amiens) by Lt Dietrich Kehl of 4./JG 26 at 16.27, 8 Sept 1943.

    Regard
    Mojmir

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Val. Mezirici, Czech Republic
    Posts
    846
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 15 Times in 14 Posts

    Default

    Hi again,
    sorry for a bad date. The 7th Sept 1943 is right.

    Regards
    Mojmir

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Aubers, France
    Posts
    2,385
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts

    Default

    hello,

    I'd be surprised by this kind of award for a successful evasion from France.

    He filed an evasion report, which can be found in TNA, Kew in WO 208/3316 report 1564. From my own experience, there's sometimes a mention in the margin when award are recommended (which doesn't mean they were eventually given).

    Also, it might be useful to try at The National Archives of Australia. If his service file is accessible, there's a possibility that the recommendation of the award, or the actual details of the award, are in it. I've recently searched the file of an Australian pilot who was captured, and there were pages about his D.F.C. in his service file.

    Joss

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    53
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    The Australian Archives list three files for F/O Mackenzie. There is his RAAF service file, the casualty file relating to the time he was considered to be a casualty after he was shot down and listed as "missing" and before he made his evasion back to England and another file in a series relating to his service career. All three files are classified as "open" which means that they are available to the general public to view personally at the archives, to request a hard print copy (for a fee) or request a digital copy (fee sometimes applies).

    The Australian War Memorial also lists two entries for him, one relating to his OBE - recommendation and award; and one for his DFC - again recommendation and award. In both cases no more detail than in the original inquiry is given.

    In the instances of both awards to F/O Mackenzie, his unit is listed as No.168 Squadron RAF.

    For more detail your best option is to seek copies of his records from Australian Archives. However at this time of year best to wait until after 4 January 2010 if you lodge any requests as they will probably be in their Christmas/New Year shut down.
    Colin Ford
    Canberra
    Australia

    No.268 Squadron Royal Air Force 1940-1946
    Historian by Appointment
    (by the surviving Squadron members)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    483
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    As Colin has suggested the most precise detail is likely to be found in the RAAF records but it seems to me that Mojmir's suggestion is most likely to be correct.

    The 168 Sqn ORB records that on 22/12/43 Mackenzie "officially rejoined the squadron". He is not listed on operations and then the entry for 5/1/44 records that MacKenzie "left for the Air Ministry concerning his future lecture tour." He is not recorded again until an operation on 10/4/44.

    Steve

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    6,560
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 47 Times in 45 Posts

    Default

    And, sadly:

    Surname: MacKENZIE
    Given Names: Roderick Maton
    Notice Type: Death Notice
    Date: 23 April, 1996
    Type: Death
    Age: 75
    Other Details: Late of North Sydney
    Publication: Sydney Morning Herald
    Published: 25 April, 1996

    Col.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    53
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default SFTS Course Photo

    Interestingly, searching the AWM site another way resulted in a photograph being found which includes the then LAC Roderick Maton Mackenzie in a RAAF No.19 Pilot's Course photo at 5 SFTS Wagga Wagga, Uranquinty.

    http://cas.awm.gov.au/item/P00903.002

    The sad part is to read the fates listed after many of the names of those on the course.
    Colin Ford
    Canberra
    Australia

    No.268 Squadron Royal Air Force 1940-1946
    Historian by Appointment
    (by the surviving Squadron members)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Val. Mezirici, Czech Republic
    Posts
    846
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 15 Times in 14 Posts

    Default

    Next fragment:

    http://www.ww2roll.gov.au/script/veteran.asp?ServiceID=R&VeteranID=1056176

    Service Record
    Name MACKENZIE, RODERICK MATON
    Service Royal Australian Air Force
    Service Number 413242
    Date of Birth 19 Sep 1920
    Place of Birth MELBOURNE, VIC
    Date of Enlistment 16 Aug 1941
    Locality on Enlistment Unknown
    Place of Enlistment SYDNEY, NSW
    Next of Kin MACKENZIE, RODERICK
    Date of Discharge 2 Nov 1945
    Rank Flight Lieutenant
    Posting at Discharge 59 Operational Training Unit
    WW2 Honours and Gallantry Member of the Order of the British Empire, Distinguished Flying Cross
    Prisoner of War No

    Mojmir

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    27
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default F/O Roderick Maton Mackenzie (Aus. 413242)

    From: Peter Ilbery’s “Empire Airmen Strike Back. The Empire Air Training Scheme and 5SFTS, Uranquinty”.

    On 7 September 1943, Flying Officer Roderick Mackenzie (19 Course) flew with 168 Sqn RAF, ADGB, equipped with Mustangs on a tactical reconnaissance of the Amiens area. At 1545, when north-east of Rouen his aircraft was hit by Flak although he was finally shot down by two FW190s. His aircraft had been on fire in the air in consequence of the Flak hits but on crash landing in a field the fire was out. Therefore he put one end of his parachute in the petrol tank and set the silk alight. He did not wait to see if the aircraft was burning well as he was being machine-gunned by the two FW190s.
    "I ran to some woods about 200 yards away, still being machine-gunned. Crawling and scrambling through very dense undergrowth, I set course south using the small compass in my aids box. After about two hours, I concealed myself and waited for darkness, setting off at dusk again in a southerly direction. About 0230 on 8 September I came across a playing field pavilion and slept there until dawn when I resumed walking again. I knocked at two houses for food and assistance but the occupants seemed scared and refused".

    That night he slept in an isolated barn and ate the chocolates from the aids box. At dusk on 9 September, he walked into Noyes and received a welcome at a farm labourer’s house, sleeping there the night. With the aid of a dictionary in the house he explained his intention to them of heading for Spain which caused them to laugh. However in the morning the son gave him a beret and a packet of cigarettes and the old man a black pin-spot tweed jacket, and with his Australian dark blue air force trousers and battle-dress blouse under his shirt, he set off. At the Les Andelys crossing over the Seine he watched the procedure a few times and then went aboard the ferry with a crowd of farmers and bathers. No one seemed to notice his clothes. He walked to the outskirts of Louvres and again slept in a barn. Walking through the town the next day he saw many German soldiers (there was a large German camp in the vicinity) but he was not challenged. Until 16 September he took any road south, singling out farmhouses en route for an occasional meal. It was obvious people would give him food but no other help. After spending 24 hours in a barn because his ankles gave out, he hobbled into St Eliph and going to the first house in the village was given a meal. They were dubious about him until he showed them his wings. He was able to wash and shave and the family washed his clothing. They bought him a ticket from Chartres to Saumer but he explained he was not keen to take the train as he had no papers. They provided him with a rather ramshackle bicycle and a cyclist’s map and he set off armed with the dictionary from the first house on 17 September. He kept to the main roads, side-slipping the large towns and cycling through others at busy times until a series of punctures halted him just south of Noyant on the twentieth. It seemed a fairly wealthy district although no assistance was forthcoming from the chateaux. At a small house he received food and managed to exchange the bicycle for a better one. In France he decided a bicycle was better than a passport as he travelled unmolested through Miort and Bordeaux to Bayonne.
    "On 25 September, I reached Cambo south of a frontier salient where there were Germans and gendarmes. It had been raining for a few days and the mountains were shrouded in mist. I left the bicycle behind a hedge and walked into the mountains, stopping at a farmhouse for a guide but was refused. A passing shepherd told me I was six kms from the frontier and to keep off the tracks as the police watched them".

    On 26 September, a woman in a farmhouse indicated that he was just ¾ km inside Spain. At Elizondo, the nearest town, he spent the night with some peasants before making for San Sebastian. A Spanish patrol stopped him and on being asked what was under his coat and his replying “pain” they seemed satisfied. At a jeweller’s shop he sold his gold watch for 120frs where he was told to take the train to Pamplona. He chose the bus and was picked up by the Guardia Civil and interrogated at the police station. Taken to Pamplona and put in jail, he asked to see the British Consul. A week later the Uruguayan Consul, who did not speak English, came and he was placed in a hotel and then sent to Lecumberri. Returned to Pamplona on 27 October,a Spanish Air Force officer escorted him and four others to a collecting center at Alhama. Thet were then taken by lorry to Madrid and on through Seville to Gibraltar where they arrived on 31 October.

    Lorraine

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •