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Thread: Awards, 14 June 1945

  1. #21
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    SMITH, Stanley Frederick, Warrant Officer (331121, Royal Air Force) - Air Publications Unit, Middle East - Member, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/9056, courtesy of Steve Brew, has citation.

    "This Warrant Officer is in charge of the issue of publications and has consistently displayed outstanding administrative ability of a high order. The manner in which he has handled the visiting representatives of many units in the Command and the equitable distribution of essential publications between them is all the more outstanding when it is realized that there is no scale laid down for such issues. Warrant Officer Smith has overcome many difficulties and has rendered fine service to the unit. In administering the sections under his control it has been one of his guiding principles to ensure the utmost economy in manpower, and the reduction in the number of civilian employees has been due to his organizing ability rather than to any reduction in the work. He has shown general cheerfulness and has maintained excellent liaison with other British and Allied units."

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    WICKS, Clarence John, Leading Aircraftman - BEM - 450614 - Lissett - RAFVR

    I would like to find out more about the above award, "jack" was my uncle who sadly passed away last year
    Last edited by Wyvern14; 7th November 2012 at 12:11.

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    WICKS, Clarence John, Leading Aircraftman (900732, RAFVR*) - Station Lissett, Bomber Command - British Empire Medal - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/9056, courtesy of Steve Brew, has citation, although the original document spells his name as “Wiges”.

    This airman’s work as a flight mechanic has been outstanding. The aircraft on which he works has completed over a hundred operational sorties without a failure and is believed to be the only Halifax III to have attained this record. He has frequently missed sleep and meals, and worked under extreme weather conditions in order to ensure that his aircraft would be ready for operations. On one occasion the bomb load fell from his aircraft just before takeoff. Without regard for personal safety, he quickly organized the replacement of the bomb load and the aircraft made a successful sortie. By his cheerfulness and enthusiasm this airman has made an excellent contribution to the fine spirit which exists among the ground crews in general.

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    Default Thank you for this information

    Quote Originally Posted by HughAHalliday View Post
    WICKS, Clarence John, Leading Aircraftman (900732, RAFVR*) - Station Lissett, Bomber Command - British Empire Medal - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/9056, courtesy of Steve Brew, has citation, although the original document spells his name as “Wiges”.

    This airman’s work as a flight mechanic has been outstanding. The aircraft on which he works has completed over a hundred operational sorties without a failure and is believed to be the only Halifax III to have attained this record. He has frequently missed sleep and meals, and worked under extreme weather conditions in order to ensure that his aircraft would be ready for operations. On one occasion the bomb load fell from his aircraft just before takeoff. Without regard for personal safety, he quickly organized the replacement of the bomb load and the aircraft made a successful sortie. By his cheerfulness and enthusiasm this airman has made an excellent contribution to the fine spirit which exists among the ground crews in general.
    Thank you so much for this information it is greatly appreciated

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    Hugh
    Would it be please be possible to see if the citations for the following are available please

    ALVEY, Desmond John, GC - OBE - 450614 - 38 Group HQ – RAF
    BATES, Eric, FL - AFC - 450614 - 1 Parachute Training School – RAFVR
    BLAKE, Mary, Corporal - BEM - 450614 - Down Ampney – WAAF
    BROCK, Christopher Henry, FO - MBE - 450614 - 1 Special Force, CMF – RAFVR
    CARNE, George Valentine, Flight Sergeant - BEM - 450614 - Down Ampney – RAF
    CHEANEY, Joseph Humfrey, FL - Comm - 450614 - 233 Sqn – RAF
    COOPER, Thomas Bruce, GC, DFC - OBE - 450614 - Tarrant Rushton – RAF
    GRAHAM, Catherine Mary, Nursing Sister - ARRC - 450614 - Down Ampney – RAFNS
    JOHNSTONE, Alexander, FL - AFC - 450614 - 233 Sqn – RAFVR
    MASON, Edgar, Acting Flight Sergeant - BEM - 450614 - 4 Parachute Training School – RAF
    MORRIS, Leonard Davis, Sergeant - BEM - 450614 - 21 Heavy Glider CU – RAFVR
    NIXON, Ronald Julian, FO - Comm - 450614 - 233 Sqn – RAFVR
    STAFFORD, George Adamson, FO - AFC - 450614 - 22 HGliderCU – RAFVR

    Thanks in anticipation
    Regards
    Andy

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    ALVEY, Desmond John, G/C (number ? Royal Air Force) - No.38 Group Headquarters, Fighter Command - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Officer Air 2/9056 (courtesy of Steve Brew) has citation.

    This officer has been the Senior Officer-in-Charge, Administration at the Headquarters since December 1943. During this time the Group has undertaken two major airborne operations, one in Normandy and one in Holland. No.38 Group expanded rapidly during the spring of 1944 and a very heavy administrtive and organizational problem had to be faced. It was larely due to this officer’s hard work and ability that success was achieved. Group Captain Alvey’s cheerfulness and willingness to tackle any task have set a very fine example.

    BATES, Eric, F/L (60456, Royal Air Force) - No.1 Parachute Training School - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/8771 has citation drafted when he had made 258 parachute descents.

    Flight Lieutenant Bates has been an Officer Instructor at No.1 Parachute Training School since June 1942. He volunteered for duty as a parachute instructor at a time when the work was distinctly hazardous. H has himself made 258 parachute descents and the experience this gained has been of great value in developing the technique for military parachuting to its present standard of efficiency. Flight Lieutenant Bates has personally qualified 2,142 from an intake of 2,383 pupils which is the largest number of pupils handled by any one officer. He has also made three operational sorties as a despatcher with Special Air Service personnel and has assisted in the compilation of the syllabus of training. This officer has given extremely consistent and meritorious service over the past two and one-half years.

    BLAKE, Mary, Corporal (2001540, Women’s Auxiliary Air Force) - Station Down Ampney, Transport Command - British Empire Medal - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/9056, courtesy of Steve Brew, has citation.

    This airwoman is an Air Ambulance Orderly. She has distinguished herself amongst a body of airwomen who have done fine work as air attendants by her hard work and unfailing cheerfulness and reliability. Her keenness to fly at all times and her skillful attention to the wounded in her aircraft are worthy of high praise. She has made an invaluable contribution to the successful working of casualty evacuation by air.

    BROCK, Christopher Henry, F/O (71109, RAFVR*) - No.1 Special Force, Central Mediterranean Forces - Member, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/9056, courtesy of Steve Brew, has citation.

    This officer has been a member of this unit for nine months. He has acted as the Principal Staff Officer to the head of the Italian Section engaged on the promotion of sabotage and guerilla warfare behind the enemy lines. He is extremely hard-working and has given selfless and devoted service. A great deal of the credit for the success of the Partisan campaign in enemy-occupied Italy must be attributed to him.

    CARNE, George Valentine, Flight Sergeant (561493, Royal Air Force) - Station Down Ampney - British Empire Medal - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/9056, courtesy of Steve Brew, has citation.

    This airman became Non-Commissioned Officer in charge of 4271 Servicing Echelon on its formation, carrying responsibilities which were later recognised to be those of a Warrant Officer. He maintained a very high standard of technical efficiency within the Echelon and close cooperation with the Squadron servicing personnel. It was largely due to the harmony thus created that the serviceability of No.271 Squadron aircraft remained consistently high, and that such satisfactory results have been achieved in recent operations.

    CHEANEY, Joseph Henry, F/L (66009, RAFVR*) - No.24 Air School, South Africa - Commended for Valuable Services in the Air - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1945. Commissioned from the ranks, 26 April 1941. Public Record Officer Air 2/8959 (material provided courtesy of Steve Brew) has citation, drafted when he had flown 2,038 hours (350 in previous six months).

    Flight Lieutenant Cheaney is an able and conscientious Flight Commander. He has been employed on instructional duties since June 1941, and has at all times shown keenness and devotion to duty in his work which he has placed before any other consideration.

    CHEANEY, Joseph Henry, F/L (66009, Royal Air Force) - No.233 Squadron - Commended for Valuable Services in the Air - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/8771 has recommendation drafted when he had flown 2,340 hours (270 in previous six months).

    Prior to joining Transport Command, Flight Lieutenant Cheaney served as an instructor. Since his posting to No.233 Squadron as pilot and captain of aircraft he has shown himself to be exceptionally reliable and enthusiastic. He has flown emergency freight to the Army in the most adverse weather and has always set a splendid example of airmanship to the pilots in his squadron. He participated in the airborne operation against the Rhine and proved his ability to carry out any dangerous mission with great courage and determination.

    COOPER, Thomas Bruce, W/C (05180, Royal Air Force) - No.502 Squadron - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 April 1942. Completed specialist engineer course at Henlow which ended July 1935 and granted Symbol E* in Air Force List. Following text from RAF Quarterly, September 1942.

    While in command of the squadron, this officer displayed great powers of leadership and raised the squadron to a high state of efficiency. He insisted in taking his place on the roster of captains of aircraft and, as such, he carried out 38 operational sorties, of which the average duration was more than nine hours. He invariably took the more difficult and hazardous tasks to himself. In carrying out his flight against the enemy, far out over the Atlantic and in extremely bad weather, Wing Commander Cooper set a magnificent example of fortitude and skill.

    NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9262 has recommendation for a DSO which was obviously downgraded.

    By his untiring efforts, this officer has raised his squadron to a high standard of operational efficiency. He possesses an unusually wide scientific knowledge and, by his perseverance and application, he has introduced several modifications to his aircraft which have improved their efficiency. Wing Commander Cooper has displayed great powers of leadership. The many tasks he has undertaken as captain of aircraft have usually been at night in very bad weather conditions and have invariabky been among the most difficult on hand. His splendid example and devotion to duty are directly reflected by the efficiency of his squadron.

    COOPER, Thomas Bruce, G/C, DFC (05180, Royal Air Force) - Station Tarrant Rushton - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Officer Air 2/9056 (courtesy of Steve Brew) has citation.

    This officer is in command of the Station. He has been associated with the development of glider towing since 1942 and has done much pioneer work in connection with the Hamilcar gliders. He has invariably done the initial test flights himself and it is largely due to his skill as a pilot that the success of the Hamilcar was obtained. On one occasion when towing a fully loaded Hamilcar on a load test, one engine failed and Group Captain Cooper towed the glider back to base, although up until that time it had been considered impossible to tow a Hamilcar on three engines. He has done much to increase the operational efficiency and confidence of his crews.

    GRAHAM, Catherine Mary, Nursing Sister (5487, Royal Air Force Nursing Service - Station Sick Quarters, Down Ampney, Transport Command - Associate, Royal Red Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/9056, courtesy of Steve Brew, has citation.

    This lady has been with the Station Sick Quarters since its formation and has been in charge of the operating theatre and Male Ward. She has been responsible for the nursing of all gravely-ill casualties whose condition made it necessary for them to be retained in Station Sick Quarters for resuscitation and operation. Her personality and skilful, conscientious work has undoubtedly been an important factor in the recovery of these men.

    JOHNSTONE, Alexander, F/L (120327, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve) - No.233 Squadron - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/8771 has citation drafted when he had flown 1,900 hours (200 in previous six months).

    This officer has served as a navigator both in Coastal and Transport Commands. He is a keen and determined navigator and an able Squadron Navigation Officer who has imbued all squadron navigators with enthusiasm. Flight Lieutenant Johnstone participated in all the airborne operations in Norther Europe and at Arnhem he successfully navigated the leading aircraft of the British stream. His efficiency, his power of imparting knowledge and the encouragement he gives to other navigators is most commendable.

    JOHNSTONE, Alexander, F/L (120327) - No.233 Squadron - Public Record Office Air 2/9642 has recommendation. for a Netherlands award that does not appear to have been granted. The text is transcribed here for the historical record.

    As navigator of the leading aircraft of a formation this officer participated in several operations during the invasion of Holland. Flight Lieutenant Johnstone’s ability and calmness in the face of fierce enemy opposition contributed in a very large measure to the successes obtained.

    MASON, Edgar, Acting Flight Sergeant (516855, Royal Air Force) - No.4 Parachute Training School - British Empire Medal - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/9056, courtesy of Steve Brew, has citation.

    Flight Sergeant Mason has been connected with paratroop training since the Royal Air Force undertook the training of Army paratroops in 1940. He was the first Non-Commissioned Officer of his trade to arrive in the Middle East when this School was formed in early 1942. In addition to his actual work in the packing, maintenance and making of various items of jumping equipment, he has been responsible for several improvements and modifications. The Dakota “Long-Strop” now in general use by British paratroops is one example of his creative ability. He has also improvised harnesses and parachutes for supply dropping in the Middle East and has himself packed over 6,000 static chutes with no failures. The exceedingly small number of parachute failures at this School is largely due to the supervision and general efficiency of this Non-Commissioned Officer.

    MORRIS, Leonard Davis, Sergeant (930265, RAFVR*) - No.21 Heavy Glider Conversion Unit - British Empire Medal - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/9056, courtesy of Steve Brew, has citation.

    This airman is a Physical Training instructor. He possesses exceptional qualities of tact, personality and leadership which have enabled him to exercise successful control of Army personnel, both officers and other ranks, under training as glider pilots. In addition to his normal duties he has taken a lively interest in the welfare of all personnel on the station. His services have been invaluable during the last three years.

    NIXON, Ronald Julian, F/O (182192, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve) - No.233 Squadron - Commended for Valuable Services in the Air - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/8771 has recommendation drafted when he had flown 840 hours (200 in previous six months).

    Flying Officer Nixon is a navigator with considerable experience of flying with Transport Command. At all times his work has been of a very high standard and his keenness and determination have played an important part in flying emergency supplies to the Army in extremely adverse weather. He has also taken part in the major airborne operations in Northern Europe during which his devotion to duty and courage in the face of enemy opposition have been most praiseworthy.

    STAFFORD, George Adamson, F/O (158301, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve) - No.22 Heavy Glider Conversion Unit/Operational Refresher Training Unit - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/8771 has citation drafted when he had flown 1,285 non-operational hours, 171 in previous six months.

    This officer joined the glider training organization as a tug pilot in July 1942. he has proved himself to be an outstanding officer, both as a tug pilot and as an administrator. By his cheerfulness and willingness to fly at any time he has set a splendid example to his colleagues and to the more junior tug pilots in his flight.

  7. #27
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    Hugh
    Thank you very much, it is most appreciated

    Regards
    Andy

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    Hello

    What a fantastic resource this site is, I wonder if I could trouble you Hugh for further details of:

    HOOD, James, FL - MBE - 450614 - Stn Woolbridge - RAFVR

    Many thanks

    D Hood, Scotland

  9. #29
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    HOOD, James, F/L (118125, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve) - Station Woolbridge - Member, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/9056 has citation. Recommendation strongly supported by Director General of Medical Services, Bomber Command,

    Flight Lieutenant Hood, a Medical Officer, has shown complete disregard for his personal safety when attending crashed aircraft. Frequently he has been the first on the scene of an accident and, without any hesitation, has entered wreckage to render whatever assistance has been possible to injured personnel. At all times when there has been likelihood of aircraft landing in an emergency this officer has always been in readiness to receive injured members of aircrews, even though it has meant long and tedious hours waiting which he has undertaken voluntarily. Flight Lieutenant Hood's prompt action has undoubtedly saved many lives and afforded much comfort to distressed aircrews who have landed at this station.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HughAHalliday View Post
    HOOD, James, F/L (118125, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve) - Station Woolbridge - Member, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945. Public Record Office Air 2/9056 has citation. Recommendation strongly supported by Director General of Medical Services, Bomber Command,

    Flight Lieutenant Hood, a Medical Officer, has shown complete disregard for his personal safety when attending crashed aircraft. Frequently he has been the first on the scene of an accident and, without any hesitation, has entered wreckage to render whatever assistance has been possible to injured personnel. At all times when there has been likelihood of aircraft landing in an emergency this officer has always been in readiness to receive injured members of aircrews, even though it has meant long and tedious hours waiting which he has undertaken voluntarily. Flight Lieutenant Hood's prompt action has undoubtedly saved many lives and afforded much comfort to distressed aircrews who have landed at this station.
    Many thanks Hugh for your quick response it is much appreciated.

    David

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