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Thread: Tools in a bomber ?

  1. #1
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    Default Tools in a bomber ?

    Hello,

    Some years ago during a digging on a crash-site I found some tools.
    Did the crews bring a tool package with them for minor reparation during a flight ??
    The digging was on a lancaster crash-site.

    Alain

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    Hi Alain,

    it depend what you mean by the term "tool package"...
    From my point of view there can be possibly:
    - an axe for emergency situation (not for repairing:)
    - mabye screwdriver and pincers for the WOP in case he needs to make some repairs of W/T set
    That is all what I will expect to find in a bomber on sortie.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Some air gunners carried small tools to clear jammed guns (with frozen hands). In my father's case, a small brass screwdriver that he had adapted.
    Ian Macdonald
    Last edited by Ian M Macdonald; 21st February 2010 at 23:30. Reason: bad typing

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    I found a spanner,a little one, and a pliers.
    When the son of the Flight Engineer came to the grave I gave him this, thinking it could have been tools of his father ...
    He received also a colt which have been kept by a local who found it at the crash-site the morning after the crash.
    The canon of the colt was lightly bend, but still in very good conditions.
    The Lancaster was DV301 of 101 Squadron.

    Alain.

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    Hi Alain,

    yes it looks meaningful - I forgot about the Flight Engineer - these things maybe very useful for him in case of any trouble. I remember a case of Czechoslovak Liberator with 2 engines cut when the Flight Engineer on the order from captain set the full power for the rest engines and it will be impossible just by hand...

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Alain,
    My father was a flight engineer and he has told me that each airplane started out with a set of tools: keeping track of them was a different matter. No details come to mind about the specific tools carried other than he used pliers/hacksaw/spanners to carry out repairs to the hydraulic lines in-flight, and he always carried a healthy-sized pocketknife.

    Hope this helps,
    Bruce
    http://www.filephotoservice.co.uk/
    RESEARCH AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES & OTHER UK INSTITUTIONS

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    I have just been reading "Only Birds and Fools" by J Norman Ashton DFC. Personally I really enjoyed this book and would recommend it.
    He was a Flight Engineer on Lancasters and several times he mentions his tool kit which was needed for potential in flight repairs.
    Best wishes
    James

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    Hello,

    I don't remember where I've read that information, but I've seen it somewhere. It was about Packard-engined Lancasters (Mk III) which were in favour of ground crews, because they came in with a set of tools (I presume from Packard, to go with their Merlin engines) compared to the Lancaster Is (Rolls-Royce engines). Can anyone confirm ?

    I was given years ago some tools recovered from a force-landed B-17, after the liberation, by a young lad at the time.

    Joss

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    I can confirm, but only in as much as I've seen that Packard toolset story too.

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    Only loosely related, but - I read several years ago that Liberators all came with a factory tool kit installed somewhere in the fuselage. By the end of the war, when new-built Liberators from some factories were notoriously overweight and tail heavy, this kit was quickly removed from each new aircraft that arrived at operational squadrons.

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