Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31

Thread: 430121 - Unaccounted airmen - 21-1-1943

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    6,447
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 34 Times in 33 Posts

    Default

    Henk,

    Through the good graces of Adrian Read, I can now impart the following on the loss of No.179 Sqn Wellington VIII HX690:

    21/22-1-1943
    No.179 Sqn
    Wellington VIII HX690 (Leigh-Light equipped).

    Took off from Gibraltar 22:00-22:20 (files unclear on this point), on 21-1-1943 for a night anti-submarine patrol over the Mediterranean. HX690 was carrying 4 depth charges, IFF and ASV. Aircraft was under observation for 66 miles from take-off. No further sight or radio transmissions from aircraft, which failed to return. Presumed shot down when attacking a U-boat.

    Crew:

    AUS402658 F/O (Capt.) Terence Harry GORDON-GLASSFORD RAAF +
    1377534 Sgt (2nd Pilot) George Edward HARVEY RAFVR +
    121472 F/O (Nav.) John Saynor HUSTLER RAFVR +
    1107562 Sgt (W.Op./Air Gnr.) John Henry BROWN RAFVR +
    CAN J/9641 F/O (W.Op./Air Gnr.) Brian Withers CARMICHAEL RCAF +
    AUS403021 P/O (W.Op./Air Gnr.) Herbert Eldon BEALE RAAF + (also mentioned as 'Obs.').

    Beale's body was washed ashore 3 weeks later, on 12 February 1943, at Port des Ruines Saintes, 25km east of Philippville, Algeria. His body was recovered by No.254 Squadron. (Beale was initially buried in Philippville Cemetery, later re-interred in Bone War cemetery).

    Gordon-Glassford, Beale and Hustler were later MiD.

    Adrian could find no mention of 122133 F/O Douglas HUNTER RAF, in the files of Beale, or Gordon-Glassford.

    So the question of what happened to F/O Hunter, is still very much up in the air!

    I would like to thank Adrian Read for his hard work on this one.

    Col.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Zelhem, Netherlands.
    Posts
    6,313
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    My thanks to you Col and to Adrian Read as well. Excellent research.
    Best regards,
    Henk.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    2,499
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    Just to add to Col's last message, if Beale's body was washed ashore near Philippville (southeast of Bone) this would suggest the Wellington had probably reached the eastern extremity of its sortie. I've been checking on the U-boat net website and have been unable to find any U-boats in this part of the Mediterranean on 21/22 Jan 1943. There were a couple about half-way between Bone and Gibraltar, but neither logged any action against an aircraft.

    I've floated a thread on the forum just in case I've missed something but at the moment I'd be inclined to suggest the loss had nothing to do with enemy action.

    Brian

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    2,499
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    I did miss something! I've been advised on U-boat net that HX690 was almost certainly the aircraft destroyed by the Italian submarine Argento. The position given is 38deg 07 min N 06 deg 38 min E, the incident being timed at 2258 on 21 Jan. (Not sure about the time datum.

    Attempting to obtain further details.

    Brian

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    2,499
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default HX690 v the ARGENTO

    Col/Henk

    Thanks to Platon Alexiades on U-boat.net I can complete the story of the loss of HX690.

    As posted previously the Wellington was shot down whilst attacking the Italian submarine Argento.

    Platon writes:

    "The ARGENTO identified the attacking bomber as of the Vickers Wellington type. It made three strafing runs (described as firing violently with its machine-guns) on the submarine but did not drop any bomb. ARGENTO replied with her own machine-guns claiming hits. On the the third it suddenly stopped firing and was seen to lose rapidly altitude, the submarine did not see it crashing but dived to forestall another attack. Minor correction to the position previously quoted: it should be 3807' N, 0638' E."

    This rather suggests the pilot was hit during HX690's third attack, causing him to lose control of the aircraft.

    Brian

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Zelhem, Netherlands.
    Posts
    6,313
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Thanks Brian; will update my file.
    Regards,
    Henk.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    2,499
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default Correction to HX690 V Argento

    Sorry Henk/Col,

    I have to correct my earlier message. It now turns out that the Argento was attacked twice during the night of 21/22 January 1943; the first time was at 2218 hours (not 2258) on the 21st by an aircraft as described in my previous post. However, I confused Platon by quoting the aircraft serial number of HX690. He didn't link this with the second attack nearly 6 hours later when the submarine claims to have destroyed U/179, the confusion arising partly because the aircraft type wasn't quoted in the submarine's report. For this second attack he writes:

    "The ARGENTO was attacked again by another bomber at 0400/22 January and this was claimed definitely shot down and most likely was U/179, position was 3758' N, 0651' E.. It could not have been the same aircraft as the one at 2218 (I do not think the aircraft could have lasted 7 or more hours in the air so far from its base). Four bombs were dropped by this aircraft and straddled ARGENTO."

    The U/179 is clearly the 179 Sqn Wellington, which leaves a bit of a riddle - was the first attack also by U/179 and broken off because of damage caused by the submarine's defences, or was it a Wellington from another squadron? I suppose there are two questions

    1.Would two aircraft have been flying an anti-submarine patrol in the same area?

    2. How long would such a patrol from Gibraltar remain airborne.

    The lack of any W/T contact with HX690 after t/o might suggest the radio was rendered u/s during the first attack.

    Apologies again for the mis-information.

    Brian

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    4,441
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 22 Times in 22 Posts

    Default

    Cpl. Tebbutt is DOAS in April 1st fligth magazine, scanned as Cpl. R. W. Tebbult
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Bewdley, UK
    Posts
    2,700
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Hi Henk,

    F1180 for Spitfire BR639 and BR181 has 3rd Party fatality noted so link to

    LAC Clifford T. JONES - 1452329 - age 38 - 124 Sqn but at North Weald.

    Regards
    Ross
    The Intellectual Property contained in this message has been assigned specifically to this web site.
    Copyright Ross McNeill 2015/2018 - All rights reserved.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Bewdley, UK
    Posts
    2,700
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Got to the bottom of my confusion with Hunter.

    F1180 confirms killed as pilot of Spitfire EN121.

    Regards
    Ross
    The Intellectual Property contained in this message has been assigned specifically to this web site.
    Copyright Ross McNeill 2015/2018 - All rights reserved.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •