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Thread: S/L W W Blessing DSO,DFC.

  1. #1
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    Default S/L W W Blessing DSO,DFC.

    Hi All,

    S/L Blessing RAAF was killed in action on the 7/7/44 when he tried to land Mosquito ML964 GB-J from 105 Sqn after being attacked by a German fighter. His Nav baled out and was safe.

    Does anyone know who the German pilot was ?

    Thanks,

    Regards,

    John.

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    Hi John,

    Can't help with Blessing's victor, but his navigator was: 170864 P/O Douglas Thomas BURKE RAFVR.

    Col.

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    Hi John

    Stuart Scott's Mosquito Thunder (No. 105 Squadron RAF at War 1942-5) provides details of Blessing's loss but, again, no mention of the German pilot.

    Andy

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    Hi Col & Andy,

    Many thanks, both he and his brother went to school in my area. His brother was KIA over the Med as well.

    Cheers,

    John.

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    From the 105 Squadron ORB
    "7.7.44. At the request of General Montgomery the largest force of bombers ever sent out in daylight by the RAF attacked CAEN in two waves. British and Canadian troops had just launched a strong attack on the City but were were encountering extremely stiff opposition from the enemy positions in the northern suburbs. Bomber Command's task was to blast these positions. Extreme accuracy was necessary as our own troops were only 2,000 yards away from the aiming point.
    Twenty Oboe markers - ten from this Squadron were ordered and 7 from this Squadron marked successfully. The main force consisted of 279 Lancasters and 160 Halifaxes, a total of 439 heavy bombers, 2,000 tons were dropped.
    The attack was a most concentrated attack the command had ever made. Clouds of dust and smoke soon obscurred the target but the flow of markers was continuous and the Main Force had no problem in identifying the targets. Spectacular explosions occurred throughout the attack and by the time our bombers had left the German defence positions were a mass of rubble.
    One Lancaster was lost and two came down behind our lines. We lost one Mosquito but P/O Burke the Navigator escaped by parachute.
    On his return he told how they has started their bombing run at 32,000 ft. with the sun right behind them. On reaching forward to pick up a chart he heard the expolsion of cannon shells and S/L Blessing put the aircraft into a dive. the fighter was lost but on pulling out of the dive it was noticed that the starboard engine was over-revving and three feet of the starboard wing was missing.
    S/L Blessing saw one of our landing strips in Normandy and decided to land there, calling up Biggin Hill V.H.F. to say he was not coming back. Suddenly the aircraft went into a spin and P/O Burke was ordered to abandon the aircraft, this he did and remembers nothing more until he woke up on a stretcher behind our lines.
    Eye witnesses on the ground said they saw one man get out of the aircraft then the aircraft broke into pieces. In view of that it must be assumed that S/L Blessing was unable to get out before the aircraft disintergrated and was therefore killed.
    S/L Blessing, an Australian joined the Squadron in October 1942 as a Flying officer and but for a short break for illness early this year has operated continously. he won the Distinguished Flying Cross for his part in numerous daylight operations and the Distinguished Service Order for leading the second formation on the low-level daylight raid to JENA over a year ago. He was, at the time of his death, "A" Flight Commander."
    Regards
    Dave Wallace
    Last edited by David Wallace; 13th April 2010 at 18:05. Reason: spelling

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