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Thread: 8-4-1943 - 31 OTU Debert - Hudson FK804

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    Default 8-4-1943 - 31 OTU Debert - Hudson FK804

    Hello All,

    Firstly, apologies folks. The Hudson serial should read -"FK408", not "FK804".

    On 8-4-1943, No.31 OTU (Debert) Hudson VI FK408, crashed near Sydney, Nova Scotia. Killed were:

    CAN R/128953 Sgt (Pilot) Thomas Vincent HYLAND RCAF

    and ...

    AUS425289 Sgt (Obs.) Percy William ELLIOTT RAAF

    Also involved was:

    CAN R/124696 Sgt Benedict Joseph McCARTHY RCAF (+5-3-1945 - No.426 Sqn. BCL6/112).

    Can anyone confirm the precise date that FK408 crashed. Was it the 7th, or the 8th of April, 1943? I also need confirmation, or otherwise, of McCarthy's involvemnent in this incident.

    I also have an unconfirmed report that AUS423949 Herbert Leslie UREN RAAF, may have been involved, which also needs confirmation, or otherwise.

    All help appreciated.

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 17th April 2010 at 05:15.

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    Default Hudson Loss

    G'day Col

    Hudson Mk. IV - No. 31 O.T.U. Debert, Nova Scotia

    The accident occurred at 21:50 hours on the 8th of April, 1943 - 46.05 N x 61.25 W (Cape Mabou Mountain, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia)

    Pilot - R128953 Sergeant T. V. Hyland - Killed

    Nav - (Aus) 425289 Sergeant P. W. Elliott - Killed

    WAG - R124696 Sergeant B. J. McCarthy - Slightly Injured


    The crew were carrying out Navigation Exercise 3 on Route 1. Fifty minutes after take-off, while at 1,000 feet, the pilot reported he was unable to climb. The Hudson hit Mabou Mountain in foul weather.

    Everything that could go wrong went wrong with this crew. The pilot had failed to carry out instructions to fly at 6,000 feet. On top of that, he had only flown 111 hours in the previous six months and had only 2 hours and 10 minutes solo night flying on the Hudson.
    It was later determined that the weather was not suitable to send him out on the exercise. The conditions were ideal for carburetor icing.

    There was a lack of understanding between the Wireless Air Gunner and the Wireless operator on the ground. The W.A.G. was using the wrong frequency. There was a lack of organization and training at the unit.

    Cheers...Chris

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    Default

    Hi Chris,

    Thanks for a most comprehensive reply, the timing is particularly welcome.

    Col.

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