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Thread: RAF Abbreviation Reference

  1. #161
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    Pavel,
    That is a very simple one - stands for Aerodrome Control Pilot. This was a rostered "duty", very much like "Duty NCO" or "Duty Officer", or "Duty Pilot", and anybody of the right rank and experience could be rostered onto this duty at any time. Generally an ACP would be a GD officer, or an NCO pilot. You can find multiple references to ACP's in various RAF publications, the one I have is the famous little book known as "The RAF Pocket Book" or AP1081, mine is the 1937 edition. The top person in the hierarchy of overseeing night flying at RAF aerodromes was known as "the Officer in charge of Night Flying" (see below). The ACP, despite the general designation, was actually only concerned with the supervision of night flying out on the aerodrome. He was not concerned with the pilots and their briefing, unless they happened to get lost or have an accident on the aerodrome.

    To quote AP 1081, Chapter VI, Section 28, para. 319, (P 85):

    (i) "Night flying will be carried out under the supervision of an experienced officer known as the 'Officer in charge of night flying'".

    (ii) "The whole of the lighting arrangements and the control of the outgoing and incoming air traffic will be under the control of one officer, or NCO pilot experienced in night flying, known as the 'aerodrome control pilot', who will be stationed in the vicinity of the first flare or floodlight."

    (iii) "the position of the officer in charge of night flying must be known to the aerodrome control pilot, and means of communication, whether by signal or by orderly (that is, a runner) must be available between them."

    Of course these notes were those current in 1937, but much of the equipment was used right through the war. However at large RAF stations in UK which accommodated large bombers of Bomber Command, or Coastal Command aircraft, electric flare-paths might have been introduced at a later stage. However pre-war equipment would remain in use at many of the smaller stations, including training stations throughout the war. This equipment comprised the notorious "goose neck flare", which was like a garden watering cans with a wick sticking out of the spout, and filled with kerosene, and several would be laid out in a row as a reference point and indication of wind direction, and hence take off and landing directions, and a floodlight, often known by its manufacturer's name as the "Chance Light".

    David D

  2. #162
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    David my sincere THANKS for your detailed and explanatory answer which is ver useful and much apreciated.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  3. #163
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    Hi,
    Am "translating" my grandfathers logbook and am struggling with a few terms - would really appreciate some help

    1: G.I. - as in G.I. Flight Circuits and Landings (this during period at Upper Heyford between first and second tours. Could it be Group Instructors flight? And what is the Group Instructors flight?
    2: Staff - in the duty column, sometimes he is simply W/OP (Wireless operator), and sometimes he is Staff W/OP. What is the significance?
    3 T.R. Training - in the remarks section, this is often the description of a flight (with a route, or area in which the flying was done)
    4. Screened W/OP - also in the duty column, sometimes he is simply W/OP, and other times he is Screened W/OP. My best guess here is that he was "testing/certifying" a W/Op who was learning/qualifying?

    Many thanks

    Chris

  4. #164
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    Hi Chris,

    2: Staff WOP or any other trade would stand for instructor of the particular trade.
    4: Screened WOP is WOP under examination

    HTH

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  5. #165
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    Hi Chris,

    the only reasonable meaning for GI I was able to find out is "Ground Instructional" but I am afraid it does not fit into your case...

    Pavel
    Last edited by CZ_RAF; 25th February 2019 at 07:04.
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  6. #166
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    Hi Chris,
    for the last time.
    as for TR, it was commonly used for "Torpedo Recconaissance" but from your description it is not cvlear if it may fit or not.
    It may be useful if you will show us more detailed examples.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  7. #167
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    I do not believe that a staff wireless operator, or observer/navigator was necessarily an instructor in that trade, although they might have been earlier in war. For instance an aircraft with a gun turret (perhaps an Anson, or a Hudson, etc) might be used for the instruction of trainee air gunners, so the full crew for a routine training sortie might comprise a pilot (staff), perhaps a navigator (also staff), and a wireless operator (staff). To complete the crew a qualified gunnery instructor would be also required. Earlier in war he would probably have been a reasonably capable air gunner who had volunteered (or was posted in after completing an operational tour). Staff pilots usually had little in the way of qualifications, but were expected to be a reasonably competent pilot, although later in war they were sent to short courses, to see that they understood their duties, and their competency was also no doubt commented upon. Similar procedures probably applied to other aircrew "staff" types, and each trade would remain under the eagle eye of the "in house" specialist in their trade when on duty at the training (or any other) unit.
    David D

  8. #168
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    David, I fully agree with your post, my explanation was not fully correct.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  9. #169
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    Hi David, and Pavel,
    Thanks for your answers - in particular around the "Staff" and "Screened". That helps my understanding a lot. Here is an example page, showing both the Staff and G.I.



    and another showing the T.R. Training


    Last edited by Krishantering; 9th March 2019 at 13:23.

  10. #170
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    Hi Chris,
    unfortunately I am not able to see the pictures.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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