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Thread: Canadian Casualties in WW2

  1. #1
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    Default Canadian Casualties in WW2

    Evening Gents,
    Some time ago I was informed that Canadian casualties in WW2 had Lakes, Montains & other features named after them. Can anyone confirm this, it seems such a fine way of remembering them.
    Where would this information be accessed.

    Regards

    David Crawford
    Last edited by David Crawford; 17th May 2010 at 18:50. Reason: subject name change

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    All Canadian provinces and, possibly the territories, too, have some features named for their military casualties. Saskatchewan is the most ambitious, with getting on for 4,000 geographical features named for their war dead.
    Doug Chisholm of La Ronge has been a leader in the field of documenting them, please take time to look at his website;
    http://www.woodlandaerialphoto.com/
    An excellent reference is AGE SHALL NOT WEARY THEM (Barry, Chisholm & Parsons), ISBN 1-897020-20-6.

    Ian Macdonald

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    There is a lake named after one of the airmen killed in my hometown Zwolle,Dennis Wilbert Johnson (428 squadron RCAF) :lake Johnson in Saskatchewan.

    Kind regards,

    Mike

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    As a sample (and with reference only to Manitoba) see the following:

    http://www.gov.mb.ca/conservation/geomatics/geo_names/honour-e/index.html

    http://biblion.co.uk/books/7766101.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manitoba_memorial_lakes

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    Default Canadian casualties

    Hi ,

    This Lake was named after Irvin Frank Hoidas , killed in action on may 20 1942 when his Srirling W7520 camed down near the town of Sint-Truiden i Belgium.

    http://www.gwmg.ca/html/media/photos/hoidas_lake_photos/index.cfm

    Greetings
    Alain12

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    What a wonderful idea. Mind you we have lots of roads after important people ie Trenchard Road is very common plus lots of Stirling, Wellington and Lancaster named roads....

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    I was told by a returned Canadian airman that this was the case .Presumably there are enough unnamed lakes etc to be able to name them after WW2 servicemen KIA ? Or were lakes etc renamed ?

    There are some streets in England named after WW2 airmen who crashed nearby .

    Anne

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    Anne, some were renamed, but many never had "official" names. The official government Atlas suggest there are over 2 million lakes in Canada! If you include "ponds" (less than 1 acre) some sources put the number at 3 million. A lot of these today have dual names, with the locals using a traditonal name, and the official Atlas listing another one.

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    Bill
    Thanks .It's handy having all those lakes !

    Off subject slightly -My pilot cousin's 466 RAAF Wellington's crew were 2 x RAAF ,2 x RAF & 1 x RCAF [Herb]
    In a letter home, writes the Australian crewman , "they were doing well for cigs [cigarettes] as Herb gets plenty from his home town in Canada " ? This was written 2 weeks before the whole crew perished when the plane was shot down over Belgium.

    Anne
    Last edited by aestorm; 18th May 2010 at 19:37.

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    Yes, those were different days. Many Canadian corporations and other groups organized drives to collect "essentials" to mail to Canadians serving overseas, including cigarettes and beer. I have read several accounts of RCAF members serving with non-RCAF units reaping the social benefits of these packages from home.

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